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Greece intends to move 5000 people to mainland but thousands still trapped on islands

The Greek government has said that it intends to transfer 5,000 people from the Greek islands to the mainland before the start of winter. Responding to the news, Nicola Bay, head of mission for Oxfam in Greece, said:

“This is a very positive step that will save lives. People across Europe are asking for action and now it is imperative that people are moved quickly and in a safe and well-coordinated manner. Winter is just around the corner and thousands of people are still sharing unheated tents exposed to the bitter cold.

“Even if we could move all 5,000 people overnight, reception facilities on the islands will still be over capacity, unsafe and unsanitary."

“The Greek government and EU member states should now end their containment policy which has created a virtual ghetto at Europe's edge.”

Oxfam and 12 other human rights and humanitarian organizations launched a campaign on 1 December calling on Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras to immediately transfer 7,500 people to the mainland by 21 December and to end the containment policy that traps people on the Greek islands.

As of 1 December, reception facilities on Lesbos, Chios, Samos, Leros and Kos were almost 7,200 over capacity: 12,744 people in facilities with a capacity of just 5,576. Last winter, three men died on Lesbos in the six days between January 24 and 30. Although there is still no official statement on the cause of these deaths, they have been attributed to carbon monoxide poisoning from makeshift heating devices in their tents. The Greek government has previously transferred around 2,000 people from Samos and Lesbos to the mainland since early November as an emergency measure.

Oxfam calls for a change of approach in the EU’s Migration Agenda, which sets Europe’s policies on migration. An Oxfam report, based on extensive field experience, highlights the danger, abuse and denial of basic rights that people face linked to the Migration Agenda’s policies. Oxfam has developed eight principles for a more humane and effective approach.

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First EU tax haven blacklist names 17 countries

Oxfam calls on Irish Government to tackle tax avoidance at home and globally
 
5th December 2017
 
EU finance ministers including Minister Paschal Donohoe have today adopted the first EU blacklist of tax havens. The list includes 17 mostly small countries. The EU has also published an additional grey list of countries that currently qualify as tax havens but have promised reforms.
 
The blacklisting process considered non-EU member states only. 
 
Reacting to the news, Oxfam Ireland Chief Executive Jim Clarken said: “We welcome the EU’s commitment to addressing the damage done by tax havens and this first concrete step towards tackling tax avoidance. However, it is worrying to see that some of the most notorious tax havens got away on the grey list. 
 
“Placing countries on a grey list shouldn't just be a way of letting them off the hook, as has happened with other blacklisting efforts in the past. The EU has to make sure governments on the grey list follow up on their commitments, or else they must be blacklisted.
 
“It’s a sad irony that if the EU were to apply the criteria to its own member states, Ireland, along with three EU countries; Malta, the Netherlands and Luxembourg would be blacklisted too. While we welcome Minister Donohoe’s support for the blacklisting process, we continue to call for him and the Irish government to tackle tax avoidance at home as well as globally. 
 
Specifically, we need the government to be proactively engaged in tackling existing tax avoidance mechanisms which Ireland is inadvertently facilitating. 
 
The EU’s list was established following a screening and a dialogue conducted during 2017 with a large number of third country jurisdictions. Those that appear on the list failed to take meaningful action to address deficiencies identified and did not engage in a meaningful dialogue on the basis of the EU’s criteria. Work on the list started in July 2016 within the Council's working group responsible for implementing an EU code of conduct on business taxation, in coordination with its high-level working party for taxation.
 
Last week, Oxfam published the report ‘Blacklist or whitewash?’, showing what a robust blacklist of tax havens would look like if the EU were to objectively apply its own criteria and not bow to political pressures. Oxfam concluded that at least 35 non-EU countries should be included in the EU tax haven blacklist. In addition, four EU member states fail the EU’s own criteria: Ireland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Malta. 
 
ENDS
 
Daniel English
Oxfam Ireland
086 3544954
 
Photos and TV-quality video footage of today illustrating a tax haven in Brussels are available and can be used by the media for free.
 
An interactive map shows the 39 countries listed in the report and explains why they should have been blacklisted by the EU.
 
The EU committed to a blacklist process in the wake of scandals like the Panama Papers and Lux Leaks that showed how tax havens let the companies and the super-rich get away with billions in unpaid taxes. The EU blacklist is based on three criteria: transparency, fair taxation, and participation in international fora on tax.
 
The EU’s blacklisting negotiations have taken place behind closed doors, and countries participating in the talks have refused to answer questions. The process has been in the hands of one of Brussels’ most secretive working bodies, the so-called Code of Conduct Group, which insists on its work being confidential.
·         86% of European are in favour of “tougher rules on tax avoidance and tax havens”, while 8% are “against the idea” according to the Standard Eurobarometer, published in July 2017.
·         Tax dodging costs developing countries $170 billion a year: $70 billion through tax dodging by super-rich individuals and $100 billion through corporate tax dodging. $100 billion could provide an education for 124 million children and pay for healthcare services that could prevent the deaths of at least six million children annually.  There are 124 million children out of school. The annual domestic financing gap to achieve universal education in low and low middle-income countries is $39 billion per year. $32 billion would fund the key healthcare to prevent the deaths of 6 million children each year.
 
Following the Paradise Papers scandal, Oxfam released a 5-point plan outlining steps governments should take to prevent further scandals on a global scale. This includes establishing a global blacklist of tax havens that naming countries such as Ireland and the Netherlands that have been key players in the Paradise Papers scandal.

 

Oxfam's new one-of-a-kind accessories shop will do a world of good

Oxfam Ireland’s unique fashion collaboration with SIX opens in Belfast 

An accessories and jewellery shop with a difference has opened in Belfast city centre – and will help Oxfam Ireland to raise vital funds for people in crisis and poverty across the world.

The new SIX 4 GOOD store, now open for business in CastleCourt Shopping Centre, sells a wide range of brand-new fashion accessories and jewellery for women, men and children, including hair accessories, sunglasses, bags, purses, mobile phone accessories and homewares.

All the new items for sale in the store have been generously donated by European brand SIX free of charge to Oxfam Ireland, with profits going to support the charity’s work worldwide in emergency response, long-term development and campaigning, including projects with women and girls.

This opening of the SIX 4 GOOD store – the first of its kind in Northern Ireland – is part of an ongoing corporate partnership with SIX, a brand of the Beeline fashion group, one of Europe’s leading suppliers of jewellery and accessories.

Michael McIlwaine, Oxfam Ireland’s Head of Retail, said: “Opening a shop which exclusively sells brand-new items from a single brand is an innovative departure for us and we’re delighted to be working with our long-standing partner Beeline on this unique collaboration.

“SIX 4 GOOD offers great value on a fantastic range, selling at discounted prices with items like rings, bracelets and earrings starting at just £2 and handbags from £7. This is exciting news for Northern Ireland’s bargain-hunting fashionistas and shoppers who like to look good and give back.”

Ulrich Beckmann, Founder and CEO of Beeline GmbH, said: “We want to give back part of our success to the community. This project is of particular importance for us and we are looking forward to continuing our successful cooperation with Oxfam Ireland to provide help for people in poverty worldwide.”

Mr. McIlwaine added: “Thanks to the generous donations by SIX, we are able to raise vital funds for our work worldwide, saving lives in emergencies like the current hunger crisis in countries like South Sudan, helping people build better lives through long-term development work and speaking out on the issues that keep people poor, like discrimination against women.

“For example, the handbag you buy in SIX 4 GOOD for £13 could provide 50 bars of soap for 50 Syrian families displaced by conflict, helping hygiene and preventing the spread of deadly diseases. Grabbing a bargain feels great but supporting families fleeing conflict or trying to lift themselves out of extreme poverty feels even better.”

For more information visit https://www.oxfamireland.org/shop/six-4good-castlecourt

 

The World’s Rainy Day Fund

Right now, across the world, millions of people are in desperate need due to a deadly combination of conflict and drought. It seems unimaginable that it could happen in 2017 – but one in nine people don’t have enough food to eat. 

We are there. We are currently on the ground helping people facing starvation in countries like Ethiopia, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen. 

Photo: Ilvy Njiokiktjien/Oxfam

These twins – a boy and a girl – were born in Zimbabwe, which last year experienced its worst drought in 35 years. Their mother Judy (36) fears for their future but is holding onto hope. Along with our partners in southern Africa we are working to ensure everyone has access to nutritious food and sustainable food sources – and we’re providing water and sanitation to people affected by the drought too. 

We want to make sure that families like Judy’s always have enough to eat and clean water to drink because these essentials aren’t just for some people, they’re for everyone. 

Our World’s Rainy Day Fund helps brighten the outlook for people in poverty. 

We must act to protect thousands from the freezing winter on the Greek Islands

As December arrives, more than 15,000 refugees – both young and old – are facing into a cold and uncertain winter on the Greek islands. Inadequate shelter, water, sanitation and medical access has led to a humanitarian crisis within the EU’s borders. This will only worsen over the coming months unless 7,500 people are transferred from the islands to the Greek mainland immediately.

Greek Prime Minister Tsipras and the EU could end this suffering, and ensure vulnerable women, children and men are warm and safe over the winter period.

Tell the Greek Prime Minister Tsipras and your government to protect those fleeing from war torn conditions in search of safety and #OpenTheIslands

The reason these refugees are not being allowed onto the mainland is as a direct result of the EU-Turkey deal. Under the deal, the Turkish government are taking refugees to Turkey, but only those people who land on the islands. Therefore refugees are being kept on the islands at all costs. While the Greek people have shown enormous solidarity and welcome to those fleeing persecution, the Greek Government now needs to play a stronger role.

EU member states should immediately and publicly call on the Greek government to transfer at least 7,500 people from the islands to the mainland. No one should be kept on the islands without accommodation or access to services, especially when there is space for them elsewhere.

Since the EU-Turkey deal came into effect, the Greek islands have been transformed into places of indefinite confinement. Thousands of refugees have been trapped in abysmal conditions, some for almost two years.

Asylum seekers live in abysmal conditions in Moria Reception and Identification Center (RIC) on the Greek island of Lesvos. Photo Credit: Giorgos Moutafis/Oxfam 

A number of hotspots have emerged – the worst being Moria refugee camp on Lesvos, which is home to more than 6,500 people, of whom 1,000 or more are children. Conditions are unhygienic and dangerous and the mental health of these people  is deteriorating.  

Poor lighting in the camp means that women are scared to go to the bathroom at night, and there aren’t enough police to protect them. A lack of sanitation also poses major health risks to thousands of people, with toilets overflowing with faeces and urine. 

With the arrival of rain and plummeting temperatures, thousands of refugees, including children, are still living in tents. Some could freeze to death this year if they are not immediately moved to proper accommodation.

This is not an unavoidable crisis. These refugees are being kept in inhumane conditions when there are alternatives. The Greek government must transfer these people to the mainland and allow them to live with dignity.

Please also join us in asking Greek President Tsipras to lift the containment policy and move 7,500 people off the islands before the official start of winter on the 21st of December. 

 

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