Emergencies

  • When an emergency hits, Oxfam is there. We work with local partners on the ground so we can save lives during times of crisis and reduce future risks. We help people caught up in natural disasters and conflicts by providing clean water, food, sanitation and protection. At any given time, we’re responding to over 30 emergency situations, giving life-saving support to those most in need.

Cyclone Idai leaves trail of death, destruction and homelessness in southern Africa

 
 
 
Oxfam will be responding with water, sanitation services, food and other non-food items to people affected by Cyclone Idai that hit Malawi, Mozambique and Zimbabwe on March 14-15. Scores of people have been killed, several hundred more are still missing and almost a million have been left destitute and in need of aid and basic services.
 
Winds of up to 140 km/h destroyed farmlands and damaged houses, some beyond repair. Damage is likely to run into millions of dollars. The Presidents of Zimbabwe and Mozambique have both declared a national disaster. 
 
Oxfam teams are assessing the needs of people worst affected in all three countries. They are reporting extensive damage to homes, crops, roads and bridges, and communications. Some areas have been rendered impassable with roads and bridges and phone lines having been washed away. 
 
“We are still gathering data from the field. It’s clear that three provinces of Zambezia, Sofala and Tete have been hit particularly hard. Information is still trickling in. It is likely that Oxfam will respond in Zambezia and Beira at least,” said Lyn Chinembiri, Oxfam Zimbabwe's Humanitarian Manager in Mozambique. 
 
Oxfam has activated its new “Emergency Response Team” of water and sanitation, food and livelihood experts to assess the chaos. They too have been hampered by broken roads, communications and continuing bad weather.
 
In Malawi, the United Nations estimates that 739,000 people have been affected, exacerbated by floods that hit the country two weeks ago. Oxfam teams are assessing people’s needs in Phalombe and Mulanje districts, which were hit hard by floods.
 
Oxfam with support from the UNICEF in Mozambique and utilizing its emergency funding in Malawi, is initially planning a three month-long response in water, sanitation and hygiene work, including the provision of purifying tablets, buckets and hygiene kits as well food aid to vulnerable households.
 
In Mozambique, Oxfam is part of the COCASA consortium (with CARE, SCF and Concern) that is being led by the General Director of the National Institute of Disaster Management. COCASA is focusing on emergency shelter, water and sanitation services and other provisions and public service support.
 
Oxfam’s Southern Africa Regional Director, Nellie Nyangwa, said: "We regret the loss of life, and the first few days were difficult days as official agencies focused on saving lives and trying to assess the impact of the floods in Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe. We expect that there will be over a million people affected in the region. We are already beginning to focus on work that will help recover people's livelihoods, prevent water borne diseases, and protect displaced people, with a key focus on women and children."
 
For more information , please contact:
 
ROI:     Nyle Lennon on 083 197 5107 / nyle.lennon@oxfam.org
 
NI:        Phillip Graham on 07841 102535 / phillip.graham@oxfam.org
 

 

Oxfam ready to reach 100,000 people with lifesaving aid after Indonesia earthquake and tsunami

 

 

Sunday 30th September 2018

Oxfam plans to reach 100,000 people in Palu city and Donggala district in the coming days after a massive earthquake and tsunami hit towns on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi on Friday.

The aid agency and local partners will prioritise distributing ‘ready-to-eat’ meals, water, hygiene supplies and emergency shelter to those in need, while continuing to assess the devastating impact of this double disaster. Oxfam stands ready to deploy additional staff and resources to the area to support the Indonesian Government-led response. 

An estimated 1.5 million people could be affected by the earthquake and tsunami, in addition to the 830 confirmed fatalities. Initial reports suggest that at least 16,732 people were forced from their homes and are scattered across 23 sites, although this number is likely to rise. The main road linking the city of Palu to the rest of Central Sulawesi has been blocked by a landslide and the airport in Palu is operating at half capacity making access difficult.

Ancilla Bere, Oxfam’s Humanitarian Manager in Indonesia, said: “Access and communication remains a big concern with a key road cut off by a landslide and other infrastructure badly damaged. It is encouraging to hear that the Indonesian Armed Forces has mobilised military aircraft and helicopters to reach people in affected areas.”

Jim Clarken, Oxfam Ireland’s Chief Executive, said: “The more information we receive, the more catastrophic the situation appears to be. We know that hundreds of thousands of people are in urgent need of life-saving aid – clean water and sanitation to stop the spread of deadly disease; food and shelter to provide some strength and comfort to those who have lost everything, now traumatised and afraid.

“We’re ready to respond and to scale-up our response as and when required. We’re appealing to the Irish public to stand with us at this crucial time by donating at oxfamireland.org and are so grateful to all those who already have.”

To donate to Oxfam Ireland’s Indonesia Earthquake and Tsunami Appeal, visit https://www.oxfamireland.org/indonesia-earthquake

ENDS

Spokespeople available here and in the region. For more information or to arrange an interview please contact: 

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND: Alice Dawson-Lyons, on +353 (0) 83 198 1869alice.dawsonlyons@oxfam.org

NORTHERN IRELAND: Phillip Graham on 0044 (0) 7841 102535 / phillip.graham@oxfam.org 

 

Oxfam prepares to respond to massive earthquake and tsunami in Indonesia

Saturday 29th September 2018                                                                      

Oxfam and its local partners in Indonesia are assessing damage after a massive earthquake and tsunami hit coastal towns in the country’s central island of Sulawesi yesterday (Friday).

Oxfam Ireland’s Chief Executive Jim Clarken said: “All of our staff and partners in the town of Palu are safe and prepared to provide emergency aid to those affected.Our partners have been working closely with the National Disaster Management Agency and local authorities in the affected area to urgently assess the situation on the ground.”

Oxfam has previously established a Humanitarian Knowledge Hub in Indonesia which consists of 16 civil society organisations in the country, led by Jamari Sakato. Oxfam in Indonesia has been working to strengthen the capacity of this alliance as the local force in disaster risk management, and it responded to help people affected by the Lombok earthquake in July 2018.

ENDS

Spokespeople available from the region and in Ireland.

CONTACT: For interviews or more information, contact: Alice Dawson-Lyons, Oxfam Ireland: alice.dawsonlyons@oxfam.org or +353 (0) 83 198 1869

Oxfam condemns attacks in Yemen, as horrific bombing kills civilians in Hodeidah fish market and hospital

3 August 2018

Oxfam has condemned yesterday’s horrific attacks on the fish market and hospital in the key port of Hodeidah in Yemen, which reports say killed at least 52 people and injured 101.

Oxfam is calling on all parties to the conflict to respect international law and protect civilians from harm, and is urging the UN Security Council to also condemn the attacks. 

The attack came as the UN Security Council met to discuss the situation in Yemen, during which the UN Special Envoy announced that parties would meet in Geneva in September.

Jim Clarken, Chief Executive of Oxfam Ireland, said: “The UN Security Council needs to take firmer action, starting by urgently condemning this and all attacks, calling for an immediate ceasefire, and for all parties to ensure the free flow of vital goods through the port to where they are needed. The Irish and UK governments can also play their part by continuing to press for international action to end the conflict.

“This summit is a welcome step towards revitalising peace efforts. In the meantime, the violence, including the escalation in the city and governorate of Hodeidah, must be addressed.

“All parties to the conflict must protect civilians from the violence and end attacks like this horrific incident. Yemen is on the brink of starvation, the cholera season is under way and the war continues unabated. The international community cannot continue to turn a blind eye.

“Powerful members of the Security Council cannot sit on their hands and allow this to continue to get worse. It is time for the UN to condemn the attacks and put their full weight behind a renewed push for peace in Yemen. All parties to the conflict must take immediate steps to end fighting and come to the table for talks to achieve lasting peace without any further delay.”

Oxfam has been in Yemen since 1983 and is stepping up its work in Yemen to tackle the humanitarian crisis. Since July 2015 Oxfam has reached more than 3 million people in nine governorates of Yemen with water and sanitation services, cash assistance and food vouchers.

ENDS

Spokespeople are available in the region and in Ireland. For more information or to arrange an interview please contact: Phillip Graham on 00 44 (0) 7841 102535 / phillip.graham@oxfamireland.org

NOTES TO EDITORS:

Hodeidah Governorate is one of the worst affected areas of Yemen with a quarter of children suffering from malnutrition. Last year it was just one step away from famine, with nearly 800,000 suffering from severe hunger and the situation remains desperate.

Oxfam is helping 10,000 people who have fled north of Hodeidah but helping those outside the city is also proving difficult due to the ongoing conflict. The port of Hodeidah is key to providing the bulk of all the food imported into the country and the majority of its medicines. If this vital life line is cut for a significant amount of time then the lives of more than 8 million people who are already on the verge of starvation will be further put in jeopardy. 

Rebuilding Al Rusul Primary School for Girls in Mosul

By Jerry Wessen, Oxfam Ireland’s Communications and Campaigns Intern.

The Iraqi city of Mosul was left devastated after occupation by ISIS – homes were ruined, schools were blown apart and infrastructure was uprooted. Now that the fighting has ended, families have returned to the city to rebuild and are slowly sending their children back to school.

One school located in west Mosul, Al Rusul Primary School for Girls, was completely destroyed. Muna Husein Kadu, the headteacher of the school explains: “It [the school] was destroyed, the furniture was broken. All our records were all over the floor. There was nothing left for us.” Students are two years behind on schooling and lost records make the situation worse.

“The kids are the ones with hope, they want to carry on and progress.”

Other than the school’s building being damaged, the bathrooms were also in dire need of attention. The toilets and sinks don’t work, and new septic tanks are needed - plus the smell makes it unbearable to step foot in the bathroom, let alone use it.

With so many obstacles already making it hard for these children to go to school, sanitation should not be one of them. So, Oxfam has focused our efforts on rehabilitating the water and sanitation systems of several schools in Mosul.

Gashaw Shareef is the lead of the project for Oxfam, in charge of contracting out the work and being the headteacher’s liaison. She explains the tasks at hand: “We clean the toilets first and then rehabilitate the sinks and then repair the taps with handles. [To] get rid of the smell is the most important thing.”

The efforts to reconstruct the bathrooms in the Al Rusul school took a total of three days, including installing new pipes and water tanks and sanitising the bathrooms.

One of the students said: “[Before], we couldn’t even go inside before because of the dirt and the horrible smell. It’s so much better now.”

Rehabilitating the bathroom was not the only goal. Gashaw explains: “We fix all the toilets and then we teach them how to use it.” Proper sanitation techniques are as important as new bathroom facilities for keeping communities safe from deadly disease.

Gashaw says: “When I see the results I will be happy, they are happy and that’s enough for me.”

 

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