Protect The Right To Refuge

Speak Out. Save Lives.

 

In his first days in office, US President Donald Trump slashed the number of refugees the US accepts and denied safe refuge for thousands based on their religion or country. Among those impacted are the world’s most vulnerable: families separated, people traumatised by war, minorities targeted for persecution. They can’t afford to wait – and neither can we. 
 
Oxfam is pressing the Irish and UK governments to speak up for people forced to flee, to press Trump to drop his Executive Order and to fill the void left by resettling more refugees, including a share of those denied entry to the USA. Please add your voice today.
Hanin Al Halayal (26) from Syria with her 4 week old baby Sana (name changed for security) in the tent they now call home in Lebanon. Photo: Sam Tarling/Oxfam
Hanin Al Halayal (26) from Syria with her 4 week old baby Sana (name changed for security) in the tent they now call home in Lebanon. Photo: Sam Tarling/Oxfam
Oxfam has joined with the American Civil Liberties Union and the Massachusetts Attorney General's office to bring a lawsuit challenging Trump's executive order on immigration. The order jeopardises our life-saving work in response to some of the world’s worst crises and places many people at risk. We work in five of the countries (Syria, Iraq, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen) affected by Trump’s order. 
 
There has never been a more urgent time to protect the right to refuge. We are in the middle of the worst refugee crisis since the Second World War.
 
We all deserve to live in safety. And we all have the right to refuge when our safety and dignity is threatened. When people are on the move, they are often at their most vulnerable.
 
Right now ordinary people forced to flee for their lives because of circumstances beyond their control are being confronted by exploitation, trafficking, police brutality, barbed wire and human rights abuses.

THE SITUATION

World leaders have failed to protect people on the move - whether in Syria, Europe or the lesser known and underfunded refugee crises in places like Tanzania, currently hosting over 130,000 Burundian refugees.

Developing countries host over 86% of the world’s refugees, compared to 70% ten years ago.

The latest tragedies at sea reinforce that attempts to solve this crisis are not working – and desperate people are paying with their lives.

In autumn 2016, world leaders gathered at a UN summit, the first of its kind, to agree a new global response to the migration crisis. Commitments were made; now we need to see action. It is vital we urge our leaders to stand as one and protect the right to refuge. 

YOU CAN CHANGE LIVES

Will you stand with us? At a time when refugees are in urgent need of aid, you can help our work on the ground.

Oxfam is on the ground in nine out of the 10 main countries of origin for refugees in the world including Syria, Afghanistan, Somalia, South Sudan and Democratic Republic of Congo, as well as in neighbouring host countries like Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey, along with supporting displaced people in countries like the Central African Republic.

In Europe, our programmes are in Greece, Italy, Serbia and Macedonia.

In Syria, Jordan and Lebanon, we have reached over 1.6 million people with life-saving clean water, sanitation and vital support for families who have lost everything.

We’re also helping families get the information they need about their rights and connecting them to special services such as legal aid.

In Europe, we are providing basic needs like food, warm clothing, blankets and housing, and personal hygiene kits.

We are also providing legal, psychological and health assistance and protection or guardianship for unaccompanied children, along with language classes.

Help us to do more. With your support, we'll be able to respond immediately during disasters, while also supporting people’s efforts to lift themselves out of poverty over the long term.

Around the clock and around the world, we’re working tirelessly to right the wrong of poverty and injustice.