Press Releases

Six-fold increase in people suffering famine-like conditions since pandemic began

  • Conflict, climate and covid - the three lethal Cs fuelling hunger 
  • People dying from hunger outpacing Covid-19 fatalities, warns Oxfam 
  • 11 people are likely dying every minute from hunger 

9 July 2021

Today, a new Oxfam report warns that as many as 11 people are likely dying of hunger and malnutrition each minute, outpacing the current global death rate of Covid-19 which is roughly seven people per minute. 

Oxfam’s report, ‘The Hunger Virus Multiplies’, says that conflict has remained the primary cause of hunger since the pandemic began, pushing over half a million people into famine-like conditions - a startling six-fold increase since 2020. This coupled with the climate emergency and economic shocks due to Covid-19 has resulted in 155 million people, a 20 million jump from last year’s figures, now living in crisis levels of food insecurity or worse.  

In addition, mass unemployment and severely disrupted food production have led to a 40 percent surge in global food prices - the highest rise in over a decade.  

Jim Clarken, Chief Executive of Oxfam Ireland said: “Today, unrelenting conflict on top of Covid-19 economic fallout, and a worsening climate crisis, have pushed more than 520,000 people to the brink of starvation. 

“Despite this, global military spending rose by $51 billion - enough to cover six and a half times what the UN says it needs to stop people going hungry.  

“Starvation continues to be used as a weapon of war as civilians are deprived of access to food and water including that provided by aid agencies. People can’t live safely, or find food, when their markets are being bombed, crops and livestock destroyed, and humanitarian access hindered.” 

Afghanistan, Ethiopia, South Sudan, Syria, and Yemen have had protracted crisis and conflict for many years, some for decades, without respite, and continue to experience extreme levels of hunger. 

More than 350,000 people in Ethiopia's Tigray region are experiencing famine-like conditions according to recent IPC analysis - the largest number recorded since Somalia in 2011, when a quarter of a million Somalis died. 

Mulu Gebre, 26, who had to flee her hometown in Tigray, Ethiopia while nine months pregnant, told Oxfam: “I came to Mekele because I heard that food and milk were offered for infants. When I arrived here, I couldn’t find food even for myself. I need food especially for my child, who is now only four months –and already born underweight.” 

Clarken concluded: “Already at-risk groups - informal workers, women, displaced people and other marginalised communities - continue to be hit hardest by conflict, disruptive climate related events and the economic disruption brought on by Covid-19.

“Governments across the world must stop conflict from continuing to fuel catastrophic hunger and instead work to address the drivers of food insecurity and ensure aid agencies can safely and quickly reach those in need. Donor governments must immediately and fully fund the UN’s humanitarian appeal to help save lives now, and the international Community via the Security Council, of which Ireland is a member, must hold to account all those who use hunger as a weapon of war.” 

END 

Contact 

Caroline Reid, Communications Manager, caroline.reid@oxfam.org

Notes to the editor 

  • Oxfam spokespeople are available for interview.
  • A multi-country written, visual and b-roll content are available upon request.
  • Download 'The Hunger Virus Multiplies': How the coronavirus is fuelling hunger in a hungry world'. 
  • Some examples of the report hunger hotspots include: 
  1. India: Spiralling Covid-19 infections devastated public health as well as income, particularly for migrant workers and farmers, who were forced to leave their crops in the field to rot. Over 70 percent of people surveyed in 12 states have downgraded their diet because they could not afford to pay for food. School closures have also deprived 120 million children of their main meal.  
  2. Yemen: Blockades, conflict and a fuel crisis have caused staple food prices to more than double since 2016. Humanitarian aid was slashed by half, curtailing humanitarian agencies’ response and cutting food assistance for five million people. The number of people experiencing famine-like conditions is expected to almost triple to 47,000 by July 2021. 
  3. South Sudan: Ten years since its independence, over 100,000 people are now facing famine-like conditions. Continued violence and flooding disrupted agriculture in the past year and forced 4.2 million people to flee their homes. Less than 20 percent of the $1.68 billion UN Humanitarian appeal for South Sudan has so far been funded. 
  • ACTION NEEDED 

There is no end to hunger unless drastic collective measures are taken to end the underlying injustices fuelling hunger. As governments rebuild after the Coronavirus pandemic, seven urgent actions are required to stop the growing hunger crisis and build more just and sustainable food systems that work for all people: 

  1. Provide emergency assistance to save lives now: Donor governments must fully fund the UN’s global food security appeal and ensure it directly reaches those most affected. Governments must also scale up social protection, including financing a global social protection fund, and support small-scale farmers and pastoralists to restock and prepare for the next planting season. 
  2. Guarantee humanitarian assistance reaches people: Conflict parties must facilitate immediate humanitarian access to help save civilians from starvation. Where aid is blocked, the international community must act to stop hunger being used as a weapon of war and hold perpetrators accountable. 
  3. Forge inclusive and sustainable peace: Warring parties must forge inclusive and sustainable peace that puts human security first and addresses urgent hunger in conflict-affected countries. Leaders should live up to their commitments to include marginalised groups including youth, women, and minorities in peace processes. Ceasefires have been shown to last longer and be more effective where women are actively involved in the negotiations.  
  4. Build fairer, more resilient, and sustainable food systems: Governments must commit to bolder actions at the upcoming UN Committee on World Food Security meeting in October in order to put fair, gender-just, resilient, and sustainable food systems at the heart of the post-pandemic recovery. Governments and the private sector must also scale-up investments in small-scale and agro-ecological food production, ensure producers earn a fair income by establishing minimum producer prices and other support mechanisms, and ensure workers earn a living wage.  
  5. Promote women’s leadership in Covid-19 solutions: Women must have the opportunity to lead on decisions related to the pandemic response and recovery, including how to address our broken food system. Action is also needed to address discrimination faced by women food producers on issues such as access to land, markets, information, credit, extension services, and technology.  
  6. Support a People’s Vaccine: To help prevent new virus variants from threatening the health of the world and its economy, G7 governments must end pharmaceutical Covid-19 vaccines monopoles to help developing countries vaccinate their populations and prevent millions more from falling into extreme poverty. 
  7. Take urgent action to tackle the climate crisis: Ahead of this year’s Climate Summit in December, rich polluting nations must dramatically cut emissions, keep global temperatures from rising above 1.5 degrees and help smallholder food producers adapt to climate change. 
  • Since the pandemic began, Oxfam has reached nearly 15 million of the world’s most vulnerable people with food, cash assistance, and clean water, as well as with projects to support farmers. We work together with more than 694 partners across 68 countries. Oxfam aims to reach millions of people over the coming months and is urgently seeking funding to support its programmes across the world.

Conflict is the primary factor pushing nearly 100 million people in 23 conflict-torn countries into crisis or worse levels of food insecurity. Source: GRFC 2021.

  • Except for Madagascar, all countries facing famine-like conditions are torn by conflict. Most countries facing IPC Phase 4 (including Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Syria and Nigeria) are also hit by conflict. 
  • The collective three drivers of hunger, Covid, conflict, and climate impacted 20 out of the 25 countries mentioned in this report.
  • According to Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) 2020 Global Report, 48 million people were living in internal displacement as a result of conflict and violence in 59 countries and territories as of 31 December 2020. This figure is the highest ever recorded.
  • Further information on report methodology sources available upon request
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Dr. Mike Ryan of WHO and UNAIDS Director Winnie Byanyima launch Ireland’s People’s Vaccine Alliance

Dr. Mike Ryan of WHO and UNAIDS Director Winnie Byanyima launch Ireland’s People’s Vaccine Alliance

  • New Alliance call on Irish government to address global Covid-19 vaccine inequity crisis 
  • Irish organisations, health practitioners, trade unions, and activists unite for a People’s Vaccine 

 8 July 2021

Today, Irish organisations, health practitioners, trade unions and activists were joined by international guest speakers including Dr. Mike Ryan from the World Health Organisation and Winnie Byanyima of UNAIDS to officially launch the People’s Vaccine Alliance Ireland.

The diverse coalition came together united in their call on the Irish government to take a stand for fairness, equality, and global health by addressing global Covid-19 vaccine inequity crisis. The People’s Vaccine Alliance are asking Ireland to use its voice within the EU to support the TRIPS waiver and to endorse the World Health Organisation Covid Technology Access Pool to facilitate the sharing of know-how by Pharmaceutical companies to increase Covid-19 vaccine production. 

The TRIPS waiver is a mechanism at the World Trade Centre that would allow for the temporary suspension of intellectual property rights for Covid-19 vaccines, treatments and diagnostics. A measure that could help break Big Pharma monopolies and increase vaccine supplies so there are enough doses available for everyone, everywhere. 

The Alliance said: “Pharmaceutical company monopolies could leave countries in the Global South waiting years for widespread vaccination. This must change, so they too can protect their citizens. Not only is it the morally right thing to do, but in addition, until the vaccine is available worldwide, we risk the emergence and spread of new variants. Restricting vaccine supply to protect profits during the pandemic means all populations remain at further risk of health and economic shocks and crises.” 

Majo Rivas, a Paraguayan-Irish People's Vaccine activist said: “I began speaking up about the TRIPS waiver and global access to vaccines because I was worried for my loved ones. I just did what most people in my shoes would do. 

“But this isn't just about Paraguay. In the news, we see the funeral pyres in India, the overwhelmed health system in Uganda, more than 1,100 children under 10 have died of Covid-19 in Brazil. Each of them someone's loved one, someone's child, someone's friend. We cannot allow more people in the Global South to lose lives and livelihoods; we need a People's vaccine now.”

Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director of UNAIDS said: “Covid-19, like HIV and AIDS, is laying bare the underlying inequalities in our world and in our societies - inequalities that ultimately hurt all of us and threaten epidemic control and our long-term recovery efforts. Fixing them, however, is possible.

“As Covid continues to devastate countries, the choice our governments face today is to take lifesaving action or repeat tragic and avoidable mistakes that resulted in millions of lives needlessly lost at the height of the HIV epidemic because life-saving treatments remained out of reach for the people who needed them. I urge the Irish Government to reconsider their current position and support the TRIPS waiver - too many lives are at risk for them not to do so."

The Alliance concluded: "Ireland is in line to get 14 million doses of at least five different vaccines during 2021, more than enough to vaccinate our population of 4.9 million. To date, over four million doses have been administered in Ireland. This affords some degree of safety, protection and comfort in the face of rapidly spreading variants such as Delta, and emerging ones like Lambda. But to truly defeat Covid-19 in Ireland, united action worldwide is required. 

"Governments and not-for-profit organisations have contributed tens of billions of Euros to the development of Covid-19 vaccines. In 2021 alone, sales of Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson and Johnson vaccines are expected to yield €50 billion.  

"To produce sufficient vaccines for everyone globally, manufacturing capacity must be greatly increased; over 140 sites have been identified as having unused manufacturing potential including large reputable pharmaceutical companies such as Biolyse in Canada, Incepta in Bangladesh, Teva in Israel and Bavarian Nordic in Denmark - all of whom have asked to assist in the manufacture of vaccines.  

"For this to happen, pharmaceutical companies must agree to share their know-how and all suitable qualified vaccine manufacturers must be permitted to produce vaccines free from patents.

"Members of our Alliance have decades of experience of how best to facilitate access to life saving medicines and vaccines in low-income countries during global pandemics. We reiterate our previous calls on the Irish government to meet with us in relation to their current position on the TRIPS waiver as a matter of urgency."   

For more information, please visit http://peoplesvaccine.ie 

ENDS 

Contact  

Caroline Reid | Oxfam Ireland | 087 912 3165 | caroline.reid@oxfam.org

Jo-Ann Ward | ActionAid Ireland | 087 768 6289 | jo-ann.ward@actionaid.org

Notes to the Editor 

  • People's Vaccine Alliance Members are available for interview.
  • Audio-visual clips from guest speakers Dr. Mike Ryan and Winnie Byanyima will be available after the event upon request. Contact caroline.reid@oxfam.org to request access.

The People’s Vaccine Alliance Ireland is coordinated by: Access to Medicines Ireland, ActionAid Ireland, Amnesty International Ireland, AMRI, Comhlamh, Christian Aid Ireland, GOAL, Friends of the Earth Ireland, ICCL, Irish General Practice Nurses Educational Association, Irish Global Health Network, Oxfam Ireland, Plan International Ireland and Trócaire.  

The people’s Vaccine Alliance Ireland’s Demands:  

  1. Ireland must use its voice within the EU to support the TRIPS waiver - Call on governments to temporarily suspend intellectual property rights at the World Trade Organisation for Covid-19 vaccines, treatments and diagnostics. This will help break Big Pharma monopolies and increase supplies so there are enough doses for everyone, everywhere. For more info, click here and here.  
  2. Ireland must endorse the World Health Organisation (WHO) COVID Technology Access Pool (C-TAP) to facilitate the sharing of know-how by Pharmaceutical companies to increase vaccine production. For more info click here.  

Frequently asked questions about Vaccine equity

The People’s Vaccine Alliance launch was supported by:  

  • Dr Mike Ryan, Executive Director, WHO Health Emergencies Programme
  • Isabel Simpson, Executive Director, Médecins Sans Frontières Ireland   
  • Majo Rivas, Paraguayan-Irish People's Vaccine activist  
  • Mustaqeem De Gama, South African Permanent Mission to the WTO in relation to the TRIPS waiver
  • Senator Alice-Mary Higgins, Irish Independent Politician 
  • Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director of UNAIDS 
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Irish INGOs call on UN Security Council to vote to keep vital humanitarian aid border crossing between north-west Syria and Turkey open

4 July 2021

A group of Irish humanitarian aid organisations are collectively calling on members of the United Nations Security Council, of which Ireland is a temporary member, to approve the reauthorisation of a vital border crossing which allows aid between Turkey and conflict affected north-west Syria.

The NGOs warn that over three million people in Syria will be left without critical life-saving humanitarian assistance if consensus, which enables aid to flow through the only remaining border crossing between Turkey and north-west Syria at Bab al Hawa, is not secured.  UN Security Council members have until July 10th to unanimously agree to renew the Syria Cross-Border Resolution.

The Bab al Hawa crossing allows humanitarian aid to be delivered to a region where 81 percent of the population, half of whom are children, are in need of support.

Concern Worldwide, GOAL, Trocaire, Oxfam Ireland and World Vision are appealing to the Security Council to approve the reauthorisation of the crossing for at least another 12 months. In addition to the Bab al Hawa border crossing, they are also calling for the re-opening of the Al Yarubiyah and Bab al Salam crossings, which have been closed over the last year and a half.

In a joint statement the NGOS say: “If the last remaining border crossing is closed off after July 10th the work of the entire humanitarian community to provide timely life-saving assistance, could be in jeopardy and the consequences will be disastrous. This cannot be allowed to happen. Ireland, with Norway, has specific responsibility at the UN Security Council to convene consensus on the text of the resolution that protects cross-border aid.”

The statement also urges the Security Council to go further to expand means for the delivery of aid by urgently reinstating the Bab al Salam and Al Yarubiyah crossings in the resolution.

The renewal of the Syria Cross-Border Resolution is the only way the Bab al Hawa crossing can remain open.

The NGO group warn that a failure to do so would result in a looming humanitarian catastrophe, with food aid supplies, Covid-19 vaccines, and critical medical supplies unable to be delivered.

It said: “The number of people in need in Syria is currently at its highest ever level, growing 20 percent in the last year alone. The ongoing economic crisis in the region coupled with the Covid-19 pandemic has led to record levels of food insecurity and economic hardship. Covid-19 continues to spread at an alarming rate while the healthcare infrastructure, decimated by years of conflict, remains woefully inadequate to respond.

“Ten years on in Syria, the need for humanitarian assistance has never been greater for 22 million civilians caught up in this horrific conflict. Some 80 percent of the population now live below the poverty line and 9.3 million people are food insecure. Access is critical to ensure that all humanitarian agencies can continue to provide life-saving assistance.”

In March the group raised their concerns about the closure of the border crossing in a joint submission to the Joint Committee on Foreign Affairs, Trade and Defence.

ENDS

NOTE TO EDITOR:

Case studies and quotes from children living in North West Syria are available on request.

Spokespeople available:

Bríd Kennedy, Middle East Regional Director, Concern Worldwide

Lorraine Marriott, Regional Director for the Middle East, GOAL

Colm Byrne, Humanitarian Manager, Oxfam Ireland

Niall O Keeffe, Head of Portfolio, FCAS, Trócaire

Maurice Sadlier, Programmes & Policy Director, World Vision Ireland

Posted In:

People’s Vaccine Alliance Ireland – Official Launch

  • Irish organisations, health practitioners, trade unions, and activists unite for a People’s Vaccine  
  • People’s Vaccine coalition call on Irish government to stand for fairness, equality and global health 

Updated 5th July 2021

What: Official launch of the People’s Vaccine Alliance Ireland

When: 13:00 – 14:00 (Irish Summer Time), July 8, 2021 

Where: Virtual event hosted on Zoom. RSVP here

Confirmed speakers:

  • Dr Ciara Conlan, Co-Founder of Access to Medicines Ireland 
  • Dr Mike Ryan, Executive Director, WHO Health Emergencies Programme
  • Isabel Simpson, Executive Director, Médecins Sans Frontières Ireland  
  • Majo Rivas, Paraguayan-Irish People's Vaccine activist  
  • Mustaqeem De Gama, South African Permanent Mission to the WTO in relation to the TRIPS waiver
  • Senator Alice-Mary Higgins, Irish Independent Politician
  • Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director of UNAIDS

Further information 

This event marks the launch of a national campaign by the People’s Vaccine Alliance Ireland—a coalition of Irish organisations, health practitioners, trade unions and activists who have come together to call on the Irish government to take a stand for equality and global health. 

The fairest and most effective way to end the Covid-19 pandemic is to ensure that everyone, everywhere has access to Covid-19 vaccines, tests and treatments. Yet, pharmaceutical company monopolies could leave countries in the global south waiting until 2023 for widespread vaccination. This must change, so they too can protect their citizens. 

Current vaccine inequity can be addressed by temporarily waiving intellectual property rights to vaccines by supporting the TRIPS waiver at the World Trade Organisation and by encouraging pharmaceutical companies to share their know-how, so that the manufacture of vaccines can be scaled up to the meet the global need. This is the morally right thing to do, but in addition, restricting vaccine supply to protect profits during the pandemic, means all populations remain at further risk of health and economic shocks and crises. 

Join us to discuss the obstacles standing in the way of global vaccine access on Thursday 8, July from 13:00, when we will hear from Irish and international speakers campaigning for vaccine equity worldwide.

For more information, please visit http://peoplesvaccine.ie

Register to attend this event launch: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_HxYiidujSHWAKkzPLUkLfw

ENDS

Contact 

Caroline Reid | Oxfam Ireland | 087 912 3165 

Jo-Ann Ward | ActionAid Ireland | 087 768 6289

Notes to the Editor

The People’s Vaccine Alliance Ireland is coordinated by: Access to Medicines Ireland, Action Aid Ireland, Amnesty International Ireland, AMRI, Comhlamh, Christian Aid Ireland, GOAL, Friends of the Earth Ireland, ICCL, Irish General Practice Nurses Educational Association, Irish Global Health Network, Oxfam Ireland, Plan International Ireland and Trócaire. 

The people’s Vaccine Alliance Ireland’s Demands:

  1. Ireland must use its voice within the EU to support the TRIPS waiver - Call on governments to temporarily suspend intellectual property rights at the World Trade Organisation for Covid-19 vaccines, treatments and diagnostics. This will help break Big Pharma monopolies and increase supplies so there are enough doses for everyone, everywhere. For more info, click here and here. 
  2. Ireland must endorse the World Health Organisation (WHO) COVID Technology Access Pool (C-TAP) to facilitate the sharing of know-how by Pharmaceutical companies to increase vaccine production.

Speaker bios:

Dr Ciara Conlan is one of the co-founders of Access to Medicines Ireland (AMI). AMI together with the other members of the People’s Vaccine Alliance Ireland have been leading voices calling for global COVID-19 vaccine equity. Ciara is a medical doctor currently working in virology and COVID- 19 surveillance. She holds a further diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Ciara has first-hand experience working on the COVID-19 wards in Ireland and has also spent time working in rural Malawi. She is interested in the intersection between social exclusion and infectious diseases, and in access to medicine problems caused by the current commercial model of drug development.

Dr Mike Ryan, Executive Director, WHO Health Emergencies Programme has been at the forefront of managing acute risks to global health for nearly 25 years. He served as Assistant Director-General for Emergency Preparedness and Response in WHO's Health Emergencies Programme from 2017 to 2019. Dr Ryan first joined WHO in 1996, with the newly established unit to respond to emerging and epidemic disease threats. He has worked in conflict affected countries and led many responses to high impact epidemics. He completed medical training at the National University of Ireland, Galway, a Master’s in Public Health at University College Dublin, and specialist training in communicable disease control at the Health Protection Agency in London and the European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training.

Isabel Simpson has a professional background in nursing and over 25 years in humanitarian work having worked in Bosnia, Sri Lanka, Zimbabwe, Pakistan, Somaliland, Iraq, North East India. As Executive Director of MSF Ireland, Isabel leads MSF’s work in Ireland – providing staff to support emergencies and MSF’s projects globally, raising funds for MSF’s operations and speaking out to highlight humanitarian crises. Isabel’s work includes bringing attention to equitable access to medicines across the world.

Majo Rivas is Paraguayan-Irish and lives in Cork. She has worked in advocacy in sexual and reproductive rights, migrant rights and disability rights. Almost all of her immediate family (whom she misses very much) is in Paraguay, so vaccine inequality is particularly close to home.

Mustaqeem De Gama is currently a Counsellor at the South African Mission in Geneva and is accredited to the WTO and UN. He has been a determined advocate, on behalf of the South African Government, for adoption of the TRIPS waiver at the WTO. He previously worked at the Department of Trade and Industry in South Africa where he headed the International Trade and Investment Directorate.

Senator Alice-Mary Higgins is a progressive, independent Senator with a strong commitment to equality, the environment and human rights. Senator Higgins was re-elected to Seanad Éireann (NUI Panel) in March 2020 where she is leader of the Civil Engagement Group, a group of Senators who each have backgrounds in civil society. Alice-Mary has held a number of other policy and advocacy roles in Irish civil society organisations and has been active in many public campaigns and referenda. 

Winnie Byanyima is the Executive Director of UNAIDS and Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations. A passionate and longstanding champion of social justice and gender equality, Ms. Byanyima leads the United Nations efforts to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030. Ms. Byanyima believes that health care is a human right and has been an early champion of a People’s Vaccine against the coronavirus that is available and free of charge to everyone, everywhere.

Before joining UNAIDS, Ms. Byanyima served as the Executive Director of Oxfam  International, a confederation of 20 civil society organisations working in more than 90 countries worldwide, empowering people to create a future that is secure, just, and free from poverty.

Ms. Byanyima was elected for three terms and served eleven years in the Parliament of her country, Uganda. She led Uganda's first parliamentary women’s caucus, championing ground-breaking gender equality provisions in the county's 1995 post-conflict constitution. Ms. Byanyima led the establishment of the African Union Commission’s Directorate of Gender and Development and also served as Director of Gender and Development at UNDP. She founded the Forum for Women in Democracy (FOWODE), an influential Ugandan NGO, and has been deeply involved in building global and African coalitions on social justice issues. A global leader on inequality, Ms. Byanyima has co-chaired the World Economic Forum and served on the World Bank’s Advisory Council on Gender and Development, ILO’s Global Commission on the Future of Work and the Global Commission on Adaptation.

Posted In:

Broadcasters Lorraine Keane and Maïa Dunphy partner up for Oxfam Bridal

  • Something pre-loved, something new, something for all brides-to-be at Oxfam's Bridal Rooms
  • Oxfam call on Brides to donate their wedding dresses – for people and planet 

16 June 2021

Today, Broadcasters Lorraine Keane and Maïa Dunphy donned their wedding dresses one more time to encourage brides-to-be to book an appointment at Oxfam's Bridal Rooms in Dublin and Belfast.

If you want to find a beautiful dress that doesn’t cost the earth (literally), you can shop with piece of mind at Oxfam Bridal where you will find wedding dresses for all tastes – vintage, designer or pre-loved! Many of the dresses you'll find are donated by bridal boutiques or designers, saving them from landfills, and have never even had their special day. So, if shopping on a budget, you could find your dream dress at a fraction of what it would normally cost.

In the mix, you will also find some beautiful pre-loved dresses, like Maia Dunphy’s stunning Jenny Packham dress – which she generously donated to Oxfam last year. Or Lorraine Keane's beautiful lace detailed dress by Spanish designer Jesus Peiro, which she bought in San Sebastián.

Lorraine Keane, Broadcaster and founder of Fashion Relief with Oxfam Ireland, said: “Your wedding day is a time to celebrate love, happiness and a future together. For many couples, incorporating some sustainable elements or charitable giving into their special day is becoming more popular. It's a great way to have a positive impact on the future of others while you celebrate your love and commitment to that special someone in your life.

“You also don’t have to spend a fortune to look a million dollars. By booking an appointment with Oxfam Bridal today you can browse and try on a selection of beautiful brand new and pre-loved wedding dresses - including my own, which I just donated to Oxfam! From vintage to the occasional designer gown, Oxfam’s dedicated Bridal Rooms in Dublin and Belfast stock all styles and sizes - a selection of which are currently on display at the Frascati Centre in Blackrock - as well a range of bridal accessories and bridesmaids' dresses. And, the extra bonus is, by supporting Oxfam, your big day creates a brighter future for people living with the injustice of poverty.”

Broadcaster and writer Maia Dunphy, who recently donated her wedding dress said: "After wearing my dress during lockdown, to raise a smile and funds for a charity close to my heart, I realised there's no point in keeping my gorgeous Jenny Packham wedding dress locked away in a bag forever. I'm never going to wear it again and feared one day I'll take it down for a peek to find a moth hole in it!

"After seeing a call out from Lorraine for donations I decided to donate it, hoping that someone else will get as much joy as I did out of wearing something so special. I would encourage other people out there to consider the same. You can give your wedding dress a second life – and contribute to another Bride’s special day - while also helping vulnerable communities the world over by donating your wedding dress to Oxfam's Bridal Rooms. ”

By choosing Oxfam, know that the wedding dress you buy will make a difference to the environment and help save lives by raising funds for Oxfam’s work across the world - whether it's reaching the most vulnerable when disaster strikes or supporting people to lift themselves out of poverty by building sustainable livelihoods.

So pay less for the dress and shop sustainably at Oxfam Bridal this year - located on George’s Street in Dublin City Centre and in Castle Court Shooping Centre, Belfast. Over the coming weeks people can see a selection of Oxfam's wedding dresses at the Frascati Shopping centre in Blackrock - where they can also pick up amazing outfits for amazing prices at Lorraine's Fashion Relief Pop-up shop.

Book your appointment with for Oxfam's Bridal Rooms today!

Oxfam Bridal Room in Dublin

Oxfam George’s Street - book your appointment online now, or contact the shop today: +353 1 478 0777 | georgesstreet@oxfam.org


Oxfam Bridal Room in Belfast

Oxfam in Castel Court Shopping Centre - contact the shop to book your appointment today: +44 28 90 231157 | castlecourt@oxfam.org

END

Contact

Caroline Reid | Communications Manager | caroline.reid@oxfam.org | 087 912 3165

Notes

Images are available for use. Contact Caroline for access.

Dress descriptions:

Lorraine is wearing her own wedding dress by Spanish designer Jesus Peiro. The colour is antique ivory. The top of the dress is Spanish lace with a French sleeve length, a scallop edge and covered buttons. The skirt is silk with a Spanish lace underskirt finished with a scallop edge. It has an Audrey Hepburn neckline and covered buttons down the back.

Maia is wearing her own wedding dress by fashion designer Jenny Packham. It is an oyster a-line 'Carmen' dress made from the most beautiful silk . The bodice features amazing beadwork, on both the striking v-cut neckline at the front of the dress with embellishment in crystal, bugle bead and sequins, and at the back on the cross over straps giving it an elegant, Art Deco feel. The dress falls beautifully to the floor with a slight train at the back. 

  • Oxfam can only accept wedding dress donations at their Bridal Rooms:
  • 90% of Oxfam's bridal dresses are brand new and have been gifted to Oxfam by designers and bridal boutiques
  • Oxfam is a global movement of people who won’t live with the injustice of poverty. Together they save lives and rebuild communities when disaster strikes. They help people build better lives for themselves. They speak out on the big issues that keep people poor, like inequality and discrimination against women. And they won’t stop until every person on the planet can live without poverty. Oxfam Ireland is one of 21 Oxfams working in over 90 countries worldwide.  
  • Broadcaster Lorraine Keane founded Fashion Relief in 2018 with Oxfam Ireland. Fashion Relief is a fundraiser extraordinaire that offers people the unique opportunity to bag a bargain from the wardrobe of their style icon or beloved brand, boutique or designer, more recently pivoting to an online interactive shopping channel where people can view and shop from the comfort of their home. Their latest show aired on Friday so there are some amazing items available to buy on – www.fashionrelief.ie. In addition, Fashion Relief has a pop-up shop at the Frascati Shopping Centre in Blackrock where people can also view a selection of wedding dresses from Oxfam's Bridal Rooms.
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