Press Releases

$72 million needed to protect Rohingya refugee women missing out on vital aid

Rohingya women living in Bangladesh are developing health problems, missing out on aid and are at greater risk of abuse due to unsafe and unsuitable facilities in many parts of the refugee camps, Oxfam warned today. 
 
The international agency called for 15 per cent of new funding to be set aside for humanitarian programs designed to better support women and girls – including $72 million of the nearly half a billion dollars recently committed by the World Bank. Currently, there is no standalone budget for meeting women’s specific needs in the overall emergency response.
 
The Bangladesh government and agencies have provided emergency aid to more than 700,000 Rohingya people who have arrived over the past year, but the speed at which the world’s biggest refugee camp sprang up has made it difficult for support to keep pace.
 
More than a third of women surveyed by Oxfam and partner agencies said they did not feel safe or comfortable going to collect water or using toilets and shower cubicles – many of which lack a roof and a lockable door. Half the women and three quarters of adolescent girls said they didn’t have what they needed to manage their periods, including a female-only place to wash sanitary cloths without embarrassment.
 
As a result, women are going hungry and thirsty to avoid needing the toilet as frequently, suffering abdominal pain and infections by not relieving themselves or using unhygienic sanitary cloths, and resorting to defecation by their tents, which increases the risk of a major outbreak of disease – especially in the monsoon. 
 
Poor facilities are also increasing the risk of sexual abuse and harassment. Hundreds of incidents of gender-based violence are reported each week.
 
Oxfam’s Advocacy Manager in Cox’s Bazar, Dorothy Sang, said: “The breakneck speed at which the Rohingya refugee crisis unfolded meant that many emergency facilities were installed in a rush and women’s specific needs weren’t considered. Women and girls are now paying the price in terms of their wellbeing and safety. 
 
“This needs to be rectified urgently with substantial sums set aside to support and protect Rohingya women, such as lighting to improve safety, toilets and wash rooms that provide privacy, and extra assistance for the most vulnerable.”
Single mothers whose husbands are missing or dead head up one in six families in the Rohingya camps. They face particular problems, having to take on public roles that challenge cultural and religious assumptions about women’s place in society. Oxfam is calling for more to be done to support these vulnerable women, such as help collecting aid packages and more community dialogue about men and women’s traditional roles.
 
Oxfam is working with local organisations and refugees to tailor its humanitarian response to more effectively support women and girls. This includes installing solar-powered lights along pathways, distributing portable solar lamps, running women’s groups to discuss issues like safety and early marriage, community work to tackle violence against women, and working with refugees to design new toilet facilities with features like lockable doors, shelves to keep clothes out of the mud, and screens to afford privacy.  
Sang added: “The Bangladesh Government should be commended for allowing Rohingya people to seek refuge in Cox’s Bazar. We join them and others in calling on Myanmar to address the discriminatory policies that are the root cause of this crisis.”
Close to a million Rohingya people have sought refuge in Bangladesh following a military campaign against them in Myanmar that has been described by UN officials as ‘ethnic cleansing’. 
 
 
ENDS           
 
CONTACT: 
REPUBLIC OF IRELAND: Alice Dawson-Lyons, Oxfam Ireland, on +353 (0) 83 198 1869 or at alice.dawsonlyons@oxfamireland.org  
 
NORTHERN IRELAND: Phillip Graham on 0044 (0) 7841 102535 / phillip.graham@oxfamireland.org
 
Rohingya refugee Ayesha with her daughter in her shelter in the camps in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo Credit: Maruf Hasan/Oxfam
 
Rohingya refugee Asia Bibi* with solar panels provided by Oxfam, in her shelter in the camps in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh.  Photo Credit: Abbie Trayler-Smith/ Oxfam

More life-saving aid needed urgently as a third big quake hits Lombok, warns Oxfam

MEDIA RELEASE 
 
More life-saving aid needed urgently as a third big quake hits Lombok, warns Oxfam
 
A third earthquake of 6-Richter magnitude which struck Lombok on Thursday (August 9th) has severely escalated the need for life-saving aid and has slowed down rescue efforts, Oxfam has warned. 
 
With the latest quake adding to the misery of tens of thousands people already in temporary shelters and under open skies, there is an increasing need for water, food, shelter, medical supplies, and other essentials. 
 
Local organisations supported by Oxfam have been on the ground since the first big quake hit more than a week ago and are assisting 5,000 people with clean drinking water, food, and tarpaulin sheets, with plans to increase the delivery of aid
 
Meili Nart, Oxfam Project Manager based in Lombok, said: “The people here are severely traumatised. They’ve lost families or don’t know where they are. In many areas, four out of five buildings, roads, and other facilities have been destroyed. It’s a struggle to find water, food, electricity and other essentials. 
 
“We’re trying to get aid to them as fast as we can. We also want to help them deal with the trauma too, but it’s difficult, and progress is slow due to conditions on the ground. We thank the Indonesian government and local organisations for their tremendous efforts, but we need to do more.” 
 
Monday’s 6.9 magnitude tremor, the largest so far, reportedly killed over 350 and destroyed the homes of over 150,000 people. Many caught in the rubble of collapsed buildings and in mudslides are still awaiting rescue. 
 
Before the latest quake, the Indonesian Agency for Disaster Mitigation said the death toll and damage could be higher with conditions making it extremely difficult to assess the devastation. Earlier reports suggested at least 600,000 had suffered from impact of the three big quakes and hundreds of tremors over the past two weeks. 
 
ENDS 
 
Oxfam has spokespeople available on the ground in Lombok, as well as in in Ireland, to discuss the humanitarian situation. 
 
Media interviews are available with:
Ancilla Bere, Oxfam Indonesia Humanitarian Manager, who will be on the ground in Lombok from Friday 10th August
Meili Narti, Oxfam Indonesia Project Manager on the ground in Lombok
Colm Byrne, Oxfam Ireland Humanitarian Manager, based in Dublin
 
CONTACT: 
 
For interviews or more information, contact: 
 
REPUBLIC OF IRELAND: Alice Dawson-Lyons, Oxfam Ireland, on +353 (0) 83 198 1869 / alice.dawsonlyons@oxfamireland.org 
 
NORTHERN IRELAND: Phillip Graham on 0044 (0) 7841 102535 / phillip.graham@oxfamireland.org 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Photo Credits: Petrasa Wacana
 

Oxfam provides drinking water and shelter to thousands as 600,000 are hit by Indonesia earthquake

 

6th August

Oxfam is providing clean drinking water and tarpaulin shelter sheets to 5,000 survivors as a devastating 7-Richter magnitude earthquake, the second within a week, hit Lombok Island in Indonesia earlier today.

The National Disaster Mitigation Agency puts the death toll at 91 with over 200 injured. 600,000 people are affected in total, with up to 80% of the population displaced in four out of the five districts of Lombak (Northern, Western, Eastern and Central Lombak). Many are still reported buried due to landslides in the hills and the rubble of thousands of homes and buildings that have collapsed following the main earthquake and multiple aftershocks.

Over 20,000 people are in temporary shelters while thousands more are under open skies in need of drinking water, food, medical supplies, and clothes. Clean drinking water is scarce due to the extremely dry weather conditions leading up the disaster.

Following the first 6.5 magnitude earthquake last week, Oxfam had dispatched a mobile water treatment plant, 1,500 tarpaulins for shelter, and clothing material, and set up an emergency relief information centre to support the work of the local humanitarian partners. Oxfam will not intensify its aid delivery efforts immediately.

While all Oxfam and partner staff on Lombok are safe, many project sites had been hit hard by the quakes halting the regular operations. However, they continue to provide emergency aid to those affected by the latest quake.

ENDS

Oxfam has spokespeople available in Ireland and on the ground to discuss the humanitarian situation.

CONTACT:

For interviews or more information, contact:

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND: Alice Dawson-Lyons, Oxfam Ireland, on +353 (0) 83 198 1869 / alice.dawsonlyons@oxfamireland.org

NORTHERN IRELAND: Phillip Graham on 0044 (0) 7841 102535 / phillip.graham@oxfamireland.org

 

Posted In:

Oxfam condemns attacks in Yemen, as horrific bombing kills civilians in Hodeidah fish market and hospital

3 August 2018

Oxfam has condemned yesterday’s horrific attacks on the fish market and hospital in the key port of Hodeidah in Yemen, which reports say killed at least 52 people and injured 101.

Oxfam is calling on all parties to the conflict to respect international law and protect civilians from harm, and is urging the UN Security Council to also condemn the attacks. 

The attack came as the UN Security Council met to discuss the situation in Yemen, during which the UN Special Envoy announced that parties would meet in Geneva in September.

Jim Clarken, Chief Executive of Oxfam Ireland, said: “The UN Security Council needs to take firmer action, starting by urgently condemning this and all attacks, calling for an immediate ceasefire, and for all parties to ensure the free flow of vital goods through the port to where they are needed. The Irish and UK governments can also play their part by continuing to press for international action to end the conflict.

“This summit is a welcome step towards revitalising peace efforts. In the meantime, the violence, including the escalation in the city and governorate of Hodeidah, must be addressed.

“All parties to the conflict must protect civilians from the violence and end attacks like this horrific incident. Yemen is on the brink of starvation, the cholera season is under way and the war continues unabated. The international community cannot continue to turn a blind eye.

“Powerful members of the Security Council cannot sit on their hands and allow this to continue to get worse. It is time for the UN to condemn the attacks and put their full weight behind a renewed push for peace in Yemen. All parties to the conflict must take immediate steps to end fighting and come to the table for talks to achieve lasting peace without any further delay.”

Oxfam has been in Yemen since 1983 and is stepping up its work in Yemen to tackle the humanitarian crisis. Since July 2015 Oxfam has reached more than 3 million people in nine governorates of Yemen with water and sanitation services, cash assistance and food vouchers.

ENDS

Spokespeople are available in the region and in Ireland. For more information or to arrange an interview please contact: Phillip Graham on 00 44 (0) 7841 102535 / phillip.graham@oxfamireland.org

NOTES TO EDITORS:

Hodeidah Governorate is one of the worst affected areas of Yemen with a quarter of children suffering from malnutrition. Last year it was just one step away from famine, with nearly 800,000 suffering from severe hunger and the situation remains desperate.

Oxfam is helping 10,000 people who have fled north of Hodeidah but helping those outside the city is also proving difficult due to the ongoing conflict. The port of Hodeidah is key to providing the bulk of all the food imported into the country and the majority of its medicines. If this vital life line is cut for a significant amount of time then the lives of more than 8 million people who are already on the verge of starvation will be further put in jeopardy. 

Oxfam ready to respond as new cases of Ebola threaten vulnerable communities in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Oxfam is launching an urgent response in Beni, North Kivu in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) as four news cases of Ebola are confirmed – just nine days after a similar outbreak in the Equateur province in the western part of the country was officially declared over.

Jim Clarken, Oxfam Ireland’s Chief Executive, said: “People in Beni are already facing unimaginable suffering – the province has been deeply unstable for years due to armed conflict and this instability extends to the whole country. Millions of people are in the DRC are in desperate need of humanitarian assistance due to the ongoing terror of violence and war. People are hungry and at risk of deadly disease – many have been forced to flee their homes. 

“Ebola has the potential to devastate communities already on the brink – and threatens our ability to help them. Having helped to tackle the previous outbreak in the Equateur province, we are urgently responding in Beni as new cases are confirmed. We will be working with communities, local partners and other aid agencies in the area to provide clean water, sanitation and information to prevent the virus from spreading further.”

In Beni, Oxfam’s ongoing work is reaching thousands of displaced people and host communities with food, clean, safe water and sanitation facilities.

ENDS

Spokespeople are available in the region and in Ireland. For more information or to arrange an interview please contact:

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND: Alice Dawson-Lyons, Oxfam Ireland, on +353 (0) 83 198 1869 or at alice.dawsonlyons@oxfamireland.org

NORTHERN IRELAND: Phillip Graham on 0044 (0) 7841 102535 / phillip.graham@oxfamireland.org

Notes to editors:

  • In the Democratic Republic of Congo prolonged and recent conflicts in Ituri, North and South Kivu, the Kasaï provinces and Tanganyika have left millions of people hungry and at risk of disease.

Pages