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Time is the most precious gift of all: Meet some of our inspiring volunteers

For over 50 years, Oxfam Ireland has had the pleasure of hosting countless generous and giving volunteers who put their heart and soul into contributing in a positive way to their local community, their local Oxfam and further afield. These volunteers give the most precious gift of all - their time, to give back to their community and to help organisations like Oxfam Ireland run smoothly and raise money to run life-saving programmes to help vulnerable people in poverty. The funds raised from our shops help to implement Oxfam initiatives such as providing clean water and sanitation in refugee camps and helping to protect and empower women farmers in Tanzania through our livelihoods programme. 

Our Oxfam volunteers are at the heart of our organisation and without their time, effort and selfless generosity, our organisation would not run as effectively as it does, providing essential aid to those who need it. 

Oxfam wants to highlight some of the volunteers who are part of our Oxfam family, striving to make the world a more just and fair place. Here are the faces of some of our volunteers, who have kindly shared their stories. We hope that you can see a little bit of yourself in each and every one of them.

Zahid, a volunteer at Oxfam Home on King’s Inn Street, Dublin on coming full circle with Oxfam

Zahid has become part of the furniture at Oxfam Home on King’s Inn Street, having given five years of hard work and dedication as a volunteer. Photo: Maria Gillan

Zahid, a student at the IBEC College in Temple Bar comes from Bangladesh and describes himself as a conscientious person. He previously worked with Oxfam, volunteering to help distribute life-saving emergency aid provided by Oxfam in Bangladesh after his country was affected by natural disasters.

Zahid says: “If a big flood happens then people lose their homes, they lose everything, they don’t have any money to buy food. They don’t have any place to stay so we help them by giving them shelter and by providing some food, or whatever else they need.”

Having previously worked with Oxfam in his home country, Zahid was motivated to continue working with the organisation when he first came to Dublin, and he has come full circle in terms of seeing how Oxfam provides life-saving aid to those in need. Zahid has now been working in the furniture shop on King’s Inn shop for 5 years from the first day the shop opened.

”I like talking and communicating with people and asking them about their lives. It’s like a daily routine for me. I like how every day is like a new start, different things happen every day.”

Zahid is not just a volunteer with Oxfam but volunteers with Saint Vincent de Paul too. “I love to have a chat with the local people, and ask about their daily routine,” he says. “It’s nice to see that you know all the Finglas local people and the customers at King’s Inn Street too. They really love me. They know which days I am working and if they don’t see me they keep asking, ‘Where is he, where is he?’” he laughs.

Zahid’s conscientious and generous spirit is not only seen by the customers in the shops that he meets daily but by his own friends and family too: “If any of my friends asks for help, if I’m able to do it, I just do it straight away. If I am able to do what you ask of me, then I can never say no, I can do it for you. I like to help others - you can say it’s a part of my character.”

Emmet James Driver: A volunteer campaigner on behalf of refugees

Emmet, volunteering on behalf of Oxfam’s Right to Refuge campaign at Longitude festival in Marlay Park. Photo: Maria Gillan

Emmet shared his story about how he became a volunteer campaigner with Oxfam Ireland and the importance of changing negative mind-sets surrounding refugees. 

Emmet’s campaigning role began when he was walking down the street one day and was approached by an Oxfam campaigner named Shazia who asked him to sign a petition. As he walked on by in a hurry, she called out: “It’s just a petition and it’s just about equality!” After hearing about the petition, he immediately signed up and when he received a follow up phone call to ask if he could become a regular supporter, he said: 

“Look, guys, I don’t have any money…but I’ve got lots of time. Do you want some time?”

When asked if he would be interested in supporting Oxfam’s Right to Refuge campaign, calling on the Irish Government to do more to protect and support refugees, Emmet replied: “Absolutely, yes I would”.

Emmet’s passion and commitment to campaigning on the refugee crisis comes from a personal story of his own:

“When I was in college I had a friend who was Palestinian who was seeking asylum here in Ireland, and he was seeking asylum for two and a half years and was denied. And then he was ordered to be deported. At that point I was so unbelievably angry because, as Irish people, we have travelled to every single corner of this planet over the last seven hundred years and every single place we went we were accepted and every single place we still go to now, people are proud to say ‘I have Irish blood’.

“In Ireland, I believe we have a sort of genetic memory of the hardships of our past. What’s frustrating is that we are not taking in as many refugees as we can, and when we do take people in, we put them into a completely inadequate situation which is Direct Provision. Then when it comes to people seeking asylum, there’s a massive long list of people and they are not allowed to work and they’re not allowed to do anything while they are seeking asylum and then they can still be denied and then deported.”

Emmet strongly believes that due to our own personal history of emigration on this island we have a responsibility to help those in need, bringing to mind a famous quote displayed on the Statue of Liberty: “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses”.

“That is what Ireland should be, because we did just that. We did it for years, even centuries, Irish people travelling abroad and we owe it to the world to offer that back. We should take people in, give them a home and be friendly to them, and welcome them into our society and into our culture as well. Anytime, I see that not happening, I get very, very passionate and I get very, very angry. Which is why, when I heard about the Right to Refuge campaign I said yes. We have to do more, to lobby our governments to provide refugees with a safe place to call home, and that’s what this campaign is about and this is what volunteering is about.”

Emmet remarks that one of the most rewarding parts of his role is when you change someone’s mind-set or when people realise the importance of the work that volunteers do:

“You’ll thank a person for signing the petition and they’ll look you in the eye and they’ll say, “No, thank YOU - you are the one doing the work.

“I find that every single person out there has the ability within them to understand the issues we’re talking about, they just have to relate it back to something they are familiar with, back to something that they can understand. And then it suddenly dawns on them that these refugees aren’t these foreign figures, they are human beings and we should give them a place to live and feel safe.”

Alex Clyde, a volunteer in Oxfam’s Belfast office on embracing opportunities

Alex is pictured at Oxfam’s office in Belfast where she volunteered as a Campaigns and Advocacy Assistant. Photo: Maria Gillan

Alex volunteered as a Campaigns and Advocacy Assistant, working in Oxfam’s office in Belfast. She first became interested in volunteering with Oxfam while pursuing her Master’s Degree in Peace and Conflict Studies at Magee University in Derry and wanted to gain work experience in the charity sector:

“Finding work in the charity sector is not easy. But I became interested in working with Oxfam as Oxfam create campaigns, not just to raise money but to actually do something to create real change to benefit those that need it. Oxfam provided me with the chance to gain work experience for a full year and I was interested in getting experience in events management and the campaigns and advocacy side of Oxfam’s work.

“I got to organise events like Culture Night, getting people involved in events, sorting out insurance matters, alongside communications work. I learned loads, it’s hectic but it’s so much fun.”

Alongside her work with Oxfam, Alex volunteers with local charities that benefit refugees, and stresses the importance of welcoming refugees into our communities:

“I believe reintegration for refugees into communities is so important and so I also do work with other organisations who deal with this. Refugees only survive on about £30 a week here, with full families living on that little per week. 

“I’ve sat down with refugees and heard their stories, some of them can be heart-breaking and make you realise the little things we take for granted. Something as simple as a guy that I was talking to from Sri Lanka whose child wanted to go swimming and he finds it hard because he can’t send his child to the swimming pool. This is because they barely have enough to feed themselves, let alone afford those activities.”

Having worked with organisations that deal directly with refugees, Alex has had first-hand accounts of refugees’ individual experiences since leaving their home countries and settling into their new home in Northern Ireland:

“I think that doing the simple things with people, like taking them out for a coffee, the little things, really welcome them into the country. They are going to settle into a really different culture so it’s so important for us to welcome them as best as we can. Going to events are great to let them know you are there but they really need the day to day interaction, asking how they are doing and so on.”

Outside of her role at Oxfam, Alex’s work and research involves dealing with the mental health issues refugees experience, especially in relation to Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and living in conflict:

“Imagine fleeing conflict and dealing with the trauma of it, then moving to another country and feeling like an outcast, it can be so damaging for them. Volunteering or having a job enables you to make friends, to get to know people, have a real purpose and create a real identity. So I think working in a volunteer capacity can be great for refugees too.”

Having worked with many local organisations, Alex knows the value of volunteering:

“With volunteering, I really feel like I’m giving back. I mean, we’re really lucky. I really recognise this, especially as a woman. I can go to school to get a full education, I can wear trousers, I can drive a car. There’s just so many things that we can do that others can’t. I have so much going for me that I feel it’s important to provide other people with that opportunity and I would definitely encourage more people to volunteer. I think that all graduates of Social Science should be made to take a year out and do something like volunteer, (such as with Oxfam!), or helping out in a foreign country. It really gives you a different perspective on the world and makes you more open-minded.”

Family matters: Chloe and Johnnie Chu, volunteers at Oxfam Books in Dublin

Siblings Chloe and Johnnie pose in front of the wide range of books available in Oxfam Books on Parliament Street shop in Dublin. Photo: Maria Gillan

Chloe and Johnnie from Dublin are brother and sister and have been dedicated volunteers in Oxfam Books on Parliament Street for a number of years. Johnnie was the first member of his family to volunteer his time with Oxfam and after seeing how much her brother enjoyed his time there, Chloe started volunteering for a few hours once a week, to give something back: 

“A normal work shift is about four hours,” says Chloe. “But I always wish it could be longer because it is amazing to see so many people of all ages take an interest in books and helping charity.” 

Chloe and Johnnie both love books and love meeting the interesting customers who visit the shop, as well as immersing themselves in the extensive range of unique books that can be found there. 

Chloe and Johnnie aren’t the only members of the Chu family who selflessly give their time to volunteer with Oxfam. When Chloe’s older sister moved to England she also volunteered with Oxfam over there too.

“There is a running joke in the family that our younger sister is going to start working here too,” laughs Johnnie. “That would make it four members of the family who volunteer with Oxfam!”

Chloe adds: “The main reason why I volunteer is because I love the idea that I am helping someone and that makes me really happy. And with every book donated or sold, that means I’ve done a successful job and we’ve all made a joint effort to help people in need – and that is what’s important.”

50 years of commitment: Kay Rogers, former Oxfam Ireland Board member and volunteer in the Belfast office

Kay stands beside a picture displaying Oxfam’s message of ‘Hope’, a message that Oxfam’s programmes strive to provide to people in need. Photo: Maria Gillan 

If there’s one lady who can be given a badge for dedication and long-term support for Oxfam’s work, it’s Kay Rogers. Kay has been an irreplaceable volunteer with Oxfam for almost 50 years and is a prime example of someone who displays real selflessness and commitment to helping those less fortunate. She is also responsible for helping to develop Oxfam’s first presence in Northern Ireland and has served in countless ways: as a volunteer Board member, a shop volunteer, an office intern, a spokesperson and a fundraiser.  

One of the best experiences that Kay has had was a trip to Tanzania to see the work that Oxfam does there and the impact it was having on the lives of people living in poverty:

“I was lucky enough to go on a week-long trip to Tanzania with Oxfam, where we visited many types of projects with small farmers. For example, we visited Kiwokukie, which was a women’s organisation that was founded by women in response to the HIV and AIDS crisis at that time. We also visited a small-scale farmer’s organisation too, where I got to see the positive impact that Oxfam initiatives have had first-hand. And it’s extraordinary, you know, for me, being an old luddite who rages against technology, to see how actually providing small-scale farmers with a mobile phone meant that they could find out the price of produce that day so they knew whether or not it was worth their while hauling their produce on a bicycle into the market or if they were going to be ripped off by traders. So if they knew they were going to get a decent price, it was worth their while going.

“I could see the benefits of these simple things first-hand. I could see progress. I saw the impact our work truly has.”

In the 50 years that Kay has been involved in Oxfam, she has seen it grow and evolve, alongside raising her family and working as a nurse in her community: “A few years ago, I was thinking of giving up as I had other important commitments and a friend of mine said to me, you’ll never do that because Oxfam runs through your veins.”

Kay understand the importance of volunteers and that’s why she has enjoyed the work she has done lately in the office which is about recognition and awards for volunteers, many of whom have been working in Oxfam shops for 20 or more years. 

“Volunteers give a gift of time and I think that just summarises it. They give the gift of their time and in return for that they need to have recognition, they need to have people say thank you. Volunteering is an opportunity to give something back to your community and you get something in return also – a new batch of friends, something positive to keep you busy, while also raising money for projects in the developing world.”

Philip O’Brien, a volunteer at Oxfam Portlaoise, on the importance of giving back

Philip, sits by the till in Oxfam’s shop in Portlaoise, where he serves customers each day. Photo: Maria Gillan

Philip was a mechanical engineer by trade, working for almost 40 years. However finding out he had cancer changed his outlook on life: “After getting over the cancer, my attitude became more positive. And it was my positive attitude that helped me get through it. I learned not to take life so seriously, and I now appreciate life so much more. I need to have a laugh so working here is great for me - we have great fun.”

“I enjoy meeting people and giving back to society. And after nearly dying, it made me realise to live for the moment and want to give back in some way. Going from working all my life to not working was a big adjustment, especially for my brain to handle.

“I don’t take life for granted in any way anymore. I’ve learned not to jump into situations too quickly and rush myself. Laughter is the best medicine. I’m a messer, I love to have the craic with people who come in to the shop.”

Volunteering with Oxfam has helped Philip to remain positive and make a difference in his community:

“I intend to work at the Oxfam Portlaoise shop for as long as possible,” he says. “Volunteering is positive for your mental state and a great way to pass the time while helping those who need it.”

Oxfam has many exciting opportunities for people who would like to make a difference and join a global movement of people who won’t live with poverty. If you would like to volunteer or find out more information on volunteering, click here.

Maria Gillan, author of this post, volunteered her time and talent to Oxfam Ireland to collate these stories as part of her university studies. We’re grateful for the energy and enthusiasm she gave to highlighting the names, faces and stories of some of our wonderful volunteers.

 

 

 

 

Bloom 2017 - A World Beyond Walls

Friday, May 26th: In recent years, new border walls and fences have materialised across the world. In total, there are now 63 borders where walls or fences separate neighbouring countries. Most of them have been constructed within the European Union. At this year’s Bloom festival (Thursday June 1st to Monday June 5th in Dublin's Phoenix Park), Oxfam Ireland and GOAL are pushing back against the border wall.

Our joint Bloom garden will open a window into ‘A World Beyond Walls’ highlighting the need for a more inclusive global society, at a time of growing division across the world.

Oxfam GOAL garden at Bloom 2017

Designed by Niall Maxwell, the Oxfam Ireland and GOAL Garden will be a vibrant, community space at the imagined location of a former border wall.

Some of the concrete-like slabs have been removed from the structure and placed in front of the old wall to create the form and function of a garden, or social space, to be enjoyed by all.

What were once parts of an oppressive obstruction will become communal seating areas where the weary can rest, where children can play, where families can picnic, and where artists can perform.

Through a grit-gravel surface, a diverse planting scheme will soften the harsh concrete angles of the garden, and a light airy canopy of trees will provide shelter and shade.

‘The Oxfam Ireland and GOAL Garden – A World Beyond Walls’ will be a space for all members of society to enjoy in a spirit of harmony and unity.

Right to Refuge campaign

We’re inviting visitors to Bloom to support our Right to Refuge campaign – we’re calling upon the Irish government to remove the barriers that tear families seeking refuge apart and to allow families to come safely to this country.

Right now, refugee children over the age of 18 are separated from parents and younger siblings, grandparents are separated from grandchildren and children travelling alone cannot reach extended family settled in Ireland who want to welcome and protect them. If you would like to learn more about this campaign, please talk to the Oxfam Ireland team at the Oxfam and GOAL Garden, or visit the Oxfam Campaigns Tent, which is located in the Conservation Zone. Using virtual reality headsets, visitors to the tent can experience the life of a woman in Iraq forced to flee her home.

To vote for the Oxfam and GOAL garden, text GARDEN8 to 51500 (standard SMS rates apply). Vote before 13:00hrs on Monday, 5th June. Votes after this time will not be counted but text votes may be charged. Please follow the voting instructions exactly or your vote may not come through. ONE vote per person per garden only. SMS Provider: Puca, +353 1 499 5939. Votes open to ROI & NI residents only.

Celebrating Volunteers: Celine Voiry from Oxfam's shop in Galway

Celine Voiry has just celebrated her one year anniversary as a volunteer at the Oxfam shop in Galway, first volunteering all the way back in March 2016. Here she tells us a bit more about herself and her work with us at Oxfam Ireland.
What does a typical day look like when you’re working in the shop?
I arrive, I open the shop, set up the till, clean up a little – just get ready for the day. I mostly work in the back: sorting and steaming clothes. I do a lot of different things! I like it because I like fashion, especially clothes and shoes.
I am an Oxfam shopper too – for me and my husband – because the shop has beautiful clothes. We get lots of great donations!
 
What’s your favourite things about working in the shop?
Shoes, shoes, shoes! And sorting and looking at the children’s clothes – I have a teenage son. I also really enjoy working with the team – I have a good manager, all the volunteers are lovely and we have a great ambience in the shop.
 
Why did you choose to volunteer with Oxfam Ireland?
I wanted to practise my English - I live in Galway but I’m originally from Paris – so I started to volunteer but now I love what I do so I decided to stay!
 
Tell us about yourself…
My hobbies are fitness and sports as well as reading books, shopping and going to the pub with my friends. I also like walking my dog. I just don’t like sitting on the sofa – I like being active!
 
Next time you’re in Galway why not pop in and say hi?
 
If you would like any further information about volunteering with Oxfam Ireland simply email volunteer@oxfamireland.org
 
Oxfam volunteer Celine Voiry

Oxfam enters merger talks with GOAL

We are delighted to share an exciting new development at Oxfam Ireland – we are entering into formal discussions with the aid agency GOAL on a potential merger.

If the merger is successful it would see our two organisations come together as one, with the proposed name of Oxfam GOAL.

We’re exploring this opportunity because we believe that together we can save more lives, deliver greater impact, achieve stronger results and support more people to lift themselves out of poverty.

Joining forces will increase the scale and scope of our humanitarian and long-term development programmes and strengthen our voice as advocates for the communities we support.

Both organisations share long-standing operations in Ireland - Oxfam since the 1950s, while GOAL celebrates its 40th anniversary this year. And we already share key areas of focus and work in many of the same countries.

GOAL’s action-oriented approach and first responder ethos is core to their DNA and has saved millions of lives. Oxfam’s approach of practical action and people-led response, challenging the structures and systems that keep people locked in poverty, has led to real change across the world. We believe that a merger would create new energy and dynamism through sharing programmatic, geographic and other synergies.

As we begin a robust due diligence exercise and examine the possibility of a merger over the coming weeks, we will continue with our life-saving and life-changing work as normal. Any partnership with GOAL will retain and respect both of our unique heritages to create a better organisation rooted in the Irish tradition of social justice.

For updates, keep an eye here and on our Twitter and Facebook.

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A year in pictures: The impact you helped to achieve in 2016

2016 was surely a challenging but rewarding year.

The continuation of conflict across the Middle East and East Africa, the ever-changing face of our climate and volatile weather systems, the rising inequality which drives global poverty and of course, the escalating refugee crisis, are challenges which have undoubtedly caused much devastation and sorrow across the world. 

And with all the challenges that exist today, it can be easy to overlook what is being achieved. 

Over the last two decades, the world has seen the fastest reduction in poverty in human history. 660 million people have lifted themselves out of poverty. Average real incomes in developing countries have doubled, and life expectancy has increased by four years.

In the past 10 years, more than 50 million children have started school in sub-Saharan Africa.

And, thanks to the amazing support of our donors, campaigners, volunteers and staff, Oxfam’s programmes this past year directly helped an incredible 22.2 million people around the world.

Because you were there to help people in crisis, we could be too. 

Every water pump you help install, every vegetable plot you help to dig, every child you send to school and every voice you’ve made heard has a powerful impact on people’s lives.

Below is just a small snapshot of some of our favourite images which show how your support helped Oxfam make an incredible difference during 2016. Take a moment to savour the achievements you’ve made possible – and know that, with your support, we did this together.

BEST FOOT FORWARD

A loan from an Oxfam-supported women’s saving group in Liberia’s Tappita district helped Beatrice Mabiam to start selling shoes again. It’s part of a scheme to help families get back on their feet after the Ebola crisis. Beatrice says: “I tell the Oxfam family thank you, big thank you, because you really empower women. Poverty is reducing so we really appreciate you.” Photo: Tommy Trenchard/Oxfam

GREEN SHOOTS

Na and Sonphet Chantahun stand in a rice field in Vientiane, Laos. Over the past decade a paved road and electricity have improved life for their village’s 50 families. But alongside this welcome progress, climate change has brought unprecedented and unpredictable weather patterns, disrupting harvests. Sonphet says: “I am happy to be working with Oxfam to set up the Disaster Risk Reduction committee in the village. I use the speaker system that Oxfam provided to give early warnings when there is a flood, so that people can move their possessions. We grow adapted rice from the Phonsung Agricultural Development Centre [an Oxfam partner].” Photo: Tessa Bunney/Oxfam

BEE-GINNING A NEW CHAPTER

Augustina lives in Nandom, northern Ghana, one of the poorest parts of the country. Oxfam is helping farmers to survive and thrive, by trialling new farming methods and alternative income-generating activities like beekeeping. “As a mother, life was stressful. We couldn’t meet our needs. We couldn’t buy the items we needed to send our children to school, like books, pens and school uniforms. Now the story is different. I can save money. I am benefitting from the bee farming, agricultural activities and livestock farming.” Photo: Adam Patterson/Oxfam

KNOWLEDGE IS POWER

Bangladeshi teenager Onima volunteers for an Oxfam partner organisation and is pictured here leading a hygiene promotion session for girls in Mymensingh. Having grown up in the slum, Onima was inspired to share her knowledge with others. “When I was younger, I attended sessions like these myself. That’s my inspiration. They taught me a lot and told me to share what I know.” Photo: Tom Pietrasik/Oxfam

THE RIGHT TO REFUGE

2016 was a big year for our Right To Refuge campaign, which demanded safe refuge for all those forced to flee from their homes due to violence and conflict. Below, Oxfam campaigners Claire Payne, Joanna Sammons, Marissa Ryan and Dan Byrne meet an Tánaiste, Frances Fitzgerald outside Government Buildings ahead of the UN Summit on migration: Photo: Brian Malone/Oxfam; Underneath, Oxfam campaigners Emma Barronwell, Kelly Fisher and Christine McCartney at Belfast docks to mark the huge support in Northern Ireland for the Right to Refuge campaign. Photo: Alex Clyde/Oxfam

A CUT ABOVE

Qassim Daoud’s* barber shop was looted and his home destroyed when ISIS took over Husseini in Iraq in 2014. Support from Oxfam after the village was liberated has helped him to rebuild the business. “My barber shop is a small shop but I like it. I like everything in my shop; it’s my shop, the thing that provides me with an income so I love everything about it. Thank God that Oxfam came and helped me open my shop again.” Photo: Tommy Trenchard/Oxfam *Name changed to protect identity

DAD’S ARMY

Alex Simusokwe, pictured with his daughter Ethel, is one of the men taking part in Oxfam’s ‘I Care About Her’ project in Zambia which raises awareness about issues affecting women, like gender-based violence and early marriage. “My wife recently died and now I am looking after our daughter. It is because of my love for Ethel that I am taking part in this project.” Photo: Kieran Doherty/Oxfam

REAPING THE REWARDS

Kitabe Terfe from Ethiopia’s Oromia region inspects her onion crops. She is part of an Oxfam horticulture project. “To tell the truth my status in the community was very low,” Kitabe explains. “We were poor. Since we have joined the group it has become much better. With the loan we got we have become more productive and have learned new skills. We also have food. We are not scared now – we don't have food insecurity. The biggest thing I have learned is to be fearless, and I fear nothing now.” Photo: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Oxfam

BUILDING BACK STRONGER

One of the biggest challenges communities in Nepal faced after the devastating 2015 earthquake was access to clean drinking water. Residents young and old came together in Dhading (pictured) to build a 4km pipeline supported by an Oxfam ‘cash for work’ scheme, bringing safe water to 500 local people. Photo: Kieran Doherty/Oxfam

BACK TO SCHOOL

Pupils at the Mersa school in Haiti – one of five benefitting from an Oxfam project to install toilets. Before children had to use unsafe public latrines or open spaces near the school, which posed a risk to their health and deterred many from attending lessons. Photo: Vincent Tremeau/Oxfam

CHILD’S PLAY

A girl at the Dahyet Qudsaya shelter in Damascus, Syria, takes part in a game teaching children about the importance of hygiene. Other activities organised by Oxfam include competitions, singing, drawing and theatre sessions with their favourite cartoon characters. They give children in the shelter something positive and engaging to focus on, helping them to meet new friends as well as keeping them safe from illness. Photo: Oxfam

GAME-CHANGER 

Tani (4) and Ronny (5) play ball in Eton village, Vanuatu, that was hit in 2015 by Cyclone Pam, one of the worst ever seen in the Pacific. 250,000 people faced unprecedented devastation, with many losing their homes and seeing their crops completely destroyed. Oxfam repaired the water system and distributed food, water, hygiene kits, livelihoods kits, packs of seeds and cash vouchers. Photo: Vlad Sokhin/Panos/Oxfam

SILENT NIGHT

Four-month-old Jalileh* was born en route from Afghanistan to Greece in the Iranian mountains, close to the Turkish border. Her father made the crib that she sleeps in with some metal, wires and a stitched blanket. Jalileh’s parents had to flee Afghanistan for their personal safety and the family are in the Filippiada camp in northwest Greece. Oxfam has provided toilets, showers and sinks to provide clean water. Photo: Aubrey Wade/Oxfam. *Name changed to protect identity

THANK YOU

None of the work we do could happen without your support. You helped save lives and rebuild livelihoods after natural disaster struck Nepal. You showed generosity and compassion to those affected by the fighting in Syria. You gave a voice to those affected by the migrant crisis and forced our governments to strengthen their responses. You pushed businesses and institutions to reform practices that reinforce inequality.

You shopped with us in our 46 shops throughout Ireland. You hosted your own events to raise awareness and funds. You donated to our fundraising efforts, including our Oxfam Unwrapped campaign. You supported our Even it Up campaign, to tackle the root causes of inequality.

Together we are changing lives for the better every day. Because we won’t live with poverty.

On behalf of Oxfam, Happy New Year!

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