Long-term development

  • We work with communities to tackle the causes of poverty through a combination of hands-on expertise, financial investment and education. In addition, we give people a voice to speak out against the laws, actions and policies that keep them in poverty.

At Oxfam, we have Christmas shopping all wrapped-up

With the Christmas rush fast approaching, the thoughts of shopping can leave our enthusiasm at a standstill. After all, at this time of the year, hitting the shops can feel more like a combat sport than a festive experience!

But shop with Oxfam and you could have your Christmas shopping wrapped-up with the click of a mouse. All you have to do is consider giving something different this year with the help of our Unwrapped gift range.

So, what is Unwrapped?

Each gift in the Oxfam Unwrapped range represents four funds and plays an important part in helping people affected by poverty to build a brighter future. Your gift will go where it’s needed most and begin to make an immediate difference. Each community we work with has different needs, so we ensure families living in severe poverty have a say in finding the best solution for them and we work with them to make that solution a reality.

How Unwrapped Works

Our amazing gift range means that there’s something for everybody – from a Goat for Christmas (€35/£32) to the WEE Gift of a toilet (€15/£13) for communities living in extreme poverty.

Or you could splash out by spending your liquid assets on Safe Water for a Family (€25/£23) to help save lives and help families thrive. With this gift, we can help set up or maintain a safe water supply for those who really need it!

The gift of Safe Water for a Family is vital for people like Amina in Ethiopia, who saw her livestock wiped out in 2017 due to drought and the lives of her children hang in the balance following a severe outbreak of cholera.

Woman carrying water back to her shelter
Amina carrying water back to her shelter. Photo: Pablo Tosco/Oxfam

The 50-year-old farmer and her family had to leave their home in search of water so they could survive. Now they are being supported by Oxfam, which is providing water and food to communities in the area.

What your gift means

Oxfam Christmas

How to Buy

Once you’ve selected your Unwrapped gifts, there are several ways you can buy:

1. Online here

2. Via email at irl-unwrapped@oxfam.org

3. Call our office at 1850 30 40 55. We’re open Monday to Friday, 9am-5pm.

4. Or simply drop into your local Oxfam shop. There, you can select your gift cards of choice and even pick up some other impactful Christmas gifts!

Everything You Need to Know to Leave a Legacy

“Putting your house in order, if you can do it, is one of the most comforting activities, and the benefits of it are incalculable.”

Happy Family

Why?

Making a will can give you a comfortable peace of mind knowing that you can look after your loved ones, friends or your favourite charities, ensuring that your wishes are respected. Oxfam is a global movement of people who will not live with poverty. Across the world, we give people the support they need to turn their lives around, stand on their own two feet, care for their children and build a future free from poverty. Last year, we helped to support 19.5 million people in 90 countries.

15-year-old Grace* from Malawi used to have to walk two hours each way every day just to get to her classroom. The walk used to make her vulnerable to harassment from young boys and the worry of this used to influence Grace*’s concentration and performance in class. Since receiving a bicycle from Oxfam, Grace* can now speed past the boys who used to bother her, and spend less time travelling to school and more time learning. This impact in Grace*’s life was made possible by gifts from amazing supporters like you.

Young Grace on her new Oxfam bicycle. Photo: Corinna Kern/Oxfam
Grace* on her new Oxfam bicycle. Photo: Corinna Kern/Oxfam

How?

It’s easier than you think! First, work out what you've got. Start by sitting down with a nice hot cup of tea and write down everything you own – including savings, possessions, property – and their approximate value. Then, note down the names of relatives and friends – people you want to include in your will.

Match up the two lists and you’ll be ready to make an appointment with your solicitor or use our FREE online will-writing service.

Our Promise to You

Leaving a gift in your will to Oxfam Ireland is one of the best ways to support our work. In return, we promise you that:

  • Your legacy will help change lives. Every euro/pound you give will be stretched as far as possible. We will invest your gift efficiently and cost effectively, so it has the most impact.
  • Your privacy is paramount. We respect your privacy and will look after your gift to us with sensitivity, care and confidentiality.
  • We know that the decision is yours alone and that circumstances can change. You may, of course, change your mind about your gift to Oxfam at any time in the future.
  • We are discreet. You don’t have to tell us if you intend to leave a gift to Oxfam, but if you do, it will help us to plan future work and allow us to thank you.

We are always here. If there is anything you want to know about your gift to us, or the communities you are helping to thrive, please get in touch.

Thank You

With the help of supporters like you, we’ve been able to transform countless lives over the past six decades. In the last 20 years alone, over 660 million people have risen out of poverty; yet still one third of the world continues to live below the poverty line. But we know we can improve that statistic. Let’s make a world without poverty with the help of your legacy!

For more information, visit https://www.oxfamireland.org/donate/legacy.

*Name changed to protect identity

How toilets fight poverty

Safe water, good hygiene, and improved sanitation save lives

 

Whether in an emergency, or for everyday use at home or at school, toilets are essential. Yet, more than 4.5 billion people don’t have a proper toilet. That’s according to the UN and the good people behind its World Toilet Day effort, launched in 2013 and celebrated every year on November 19, which raises awareness about the role toilets play in fighting poverty.

Living in a world without decent toilets (especially ones connected to a system that safely handles waste) puts people at risk of disease, pollutes the environment, and discourages girls from attending school.

That’s why Oxfam provides toilets, clean water, and encourages good hygiene practices in the wake of natural disasters and other emergencies, and works with communities to build decent latrines and proper sanitation systems for everyday use. Safe water, good hygiene, and improved sanitation can save as many as 842,000 lives per year, according to the UN. Toilets can actually save lives!

See for yourself the difference toilets make, every day and in emergencies.

Toilets and Clean Water Overlooked Essentials

Pakistan: Who takes the heat for the climate crisis?

“Yesterday, my daughter fainted in assembly,” says Hooran. “Her teacher told her to start eating fruit in the mornings before she comes to school so she has enough energy. It made me so upset to hear that, because we barely have enough money to buy roti (bread). Fruits are a long shot away.”

Pakistani woman looks at the camera
Photo: Khaula Jamil/Oxfam

This is what life on the frontline of the climate crisis is like for Hooran in Badin, Pakistan. She’s one of the 1.8 million people living there who endure frequent floods, but also drought-like conditions caused by a lack of water and changing rainfall patterns. All of this means it’s harder to grow crops, feed livestock, and get by from one day to the next.

Woman waters her dry crops
Photo: Khaula Jamil/Oxfam

“MY CHILDREN ARE NOT HEALTHY,” SAYS HOORAN. “THEY ARE QUITE WEAK BECAUSE OF THE LACK OF NUTRITION AVAILABLE TO THEM.”

This is worlds away from the childhood Hooran remembers.

“Growing up, I used to go to school, cut wood to earn money, and help my mother with the chores. In our house there was livestock, farming and my mother’s tailoring business, and all of this meant we had multiple sources of income. I had a very happy childhood because of this.”

But as the years went on, the weather became less predictable – and so did the harvests.

Very dry cracked land
Photo: Khaula Jamil/Oxfam

“OUR CROPS STARTED DECREASING. WE USED TO GROW RICE, SUGARCANE AND COTTON. WHEN THE FARMING STARTED TO FAIL, WE STARTED SELLING THE LIVESTOCK TO SURVIVE.”

In 2003, a cyclone caused flooding that destroyed all of Hooran’s crops and land. Oxfam is helping people prepare for climate change, deal with its effects, and adapt when disaster strikes. In Badin, we’re focusing on supporting women, young people and people with disabilities to develop new farming methods and learn other skills to make a living.

Hooran learned new skills so she can earn money beyond farming.

Woman learns to tailor for new livelihood
Photo: Khaula Jamil/Oxfam

“I learnt how to stitch, make soap bars and gurda (a local drink made from sugarcane). I chose to be a part of the training to learn how to sew undergarments. I wanted to make it better for women and girls here when they go through their period. We have to suffer through really unhygienic conditions because we don’t have the resources to buy pads, and they are so expensive. So I want to start making these undergarments so they can use them during this time.”

She’s also learned how to grow vegetables even under the unforgiving conditions that the extreme weather brings. “Before the training we could only buy stale vegetables, but now we can grow our own fresh vegetables with our own hands… now we are free from that stress.”

Hand touching a seedling
Photo: Khaula Jamil/Oxfam

There is still much work to do but Hooran is adapting fast so she can earn a living. This shouldn’t have to be her reality. It is a fact that he world’s poorest people have contributed the least to the climate emergency, yet they are suffering the most.

Urgent action is needed to save our planet.

Oxfam report: The power of education to fight inequality

school in santa cruz nicaragua
School in Santa Cruz, Nicaragua. Photo: William Vest-Lillesø

Inequality is reaching new extremes. Significant increases in inequality of both income and wealth are leading to larger gaps between rich and poor, men and women.

This is creating serious obstacles to overcoming poverty and exclusion, and stopping us from beating poverty. With women substantially over-represented in the ranks of the poorest, this is also reinforcing gender inequality, blocking progress on women’s rights. These inequalities threaten to pull our societies apart, and unravel the social contract between state and citizen, by undermining social cohesion and eroding democratic institutions.

But inequality is not inevitable. It is a political choice. It is the result of deliberate policy choices made by governments and international organizations. Conversely, it is now broadly agreed by most global policy makers that extreme inequality is also avoidable, and that concrete steps can be taken to reduce inequality.

Good-quality education can be liberating for individuals, and it can act as a leveller and equalizer within society. This report will show the unparalleled power of education to level the playing field, to help close the growing divides, and bring us closer together.

Find the report and the summary at Oxfam.org

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