Long-term development

  • We work with communities to tackle the causes of poverty through a combination of hands-on expertise, financial investment and education. In addition, we give people a voice to speak out against the laws, actions and policies that keep them in poverty.

Cyclone Idai: One year on, communities are still suffering

Cyclone Idai made landfall on 14th March 2019, destroying livelihoods and homes across southern Africa. Today, hundreds of thousands of people in Zimbabwe, Malawi and Mozambique are still suffering the consequences of one of the worst cyclones to hit Africa.

Maria, 31, with her six children with their only belongings sheltering from the rain by the side of the road. Photo: Elena Heatherwick/Oxfam

A new Oxfam briefing, After the Storm, reveals that thousands of people in Mozambique and Zimbabwe are still living in destroyed or damaged homes and makeshift shelters, with an estimated 8.7 million people in desperate need of food as a result of extreme weather events and localised conflict. Critical infrastructure including roads, water supplies, and schools remain in disrepair, making it even more difficult for people to access vital services or get back to work.

A toxic combination of factors – including an intensifying cycle of floods, drought and storms; deep rooted poverty and inequality; a patchy humanitarian response; and the lack of support for poor communities to adapt to changing climate or recover from disaster – have increased people’s vulnerability and made it harder for people to recover.

Flooded shops and homes in Lamego district, Mozambique as of February 2020. Photo: Elena Heatherwick/Oxfam

Virginia Defunho, a farmer who lives in Josina Machel village in Mozambique with her husband and seven children, lost everything in the cyclone - their home, crops, chickens and most of their possessions. She replanted her fields in December, but her crops were damaged by another severe flood this January. Oxfam’s partner Kulima is providing Virginia with tools and seeds to plant again on a rented plot on higher ground.

“The hardest thing now is the lack of food. Sometimes I go to bed hungry. The child cries, wanting something to eat, and it makes me feel angry sometimes, because the child is crying because he wants food and there is nothing to give.

Amelia (right) and Virginia (left) have been neighbours since 1996. They cannot farm where they live any more because of frequent flooding so they are renting plots on higher ground to grow crops using the seeds provided. Photo: Elena Heatherwick/Oxfam

“Idai has destroyed my mind. I have a child who has succeeded to grade ten, but I don't have the money to pay for him to enrol back at school. If life was normal, I would have some crops to sell and I would get some money and my child would be back at school.   

“We are worried about the future because we don't know if the weather is going to be like this or if it will change back to normal like it was before. We worry about another cyclone coming. If it comes a second time, what will our lives be? How is it going to be?”

Oxfam raised funds to assist people across Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe in the aftermath of the cyclones. With our partners, we provided emergency assistance such as food aid, blankets and hygiene kits; installed latrines and water pumps in temporary camps; and helped raise awareness of issues such as gender-based violence - which often spikes after a disaster. In the long term, Oxfam is working with communities to help them adapt in the face of a changing climate – for example by helping smallholder farmers diversify their crops and adapt their farming techniques.

Cyclone Idai is just one of many extreme weather events to have hit southern Africa in recent years. Despite the escalating climate crisis, poor communities are not getting the help they need to adapt, and world leaders have failed to ensure a dedicated global fund to help countries rebuild from the loss and damage caused by climate fuelled disasters.

Donate now to support Oxfam’s work in southern Africa and beyond.

Oxfam among finalists for EU's €1m Blockchains for Social Good prize

At Oxfam Ireland, we have our eyes on the prize – the prize being a €1 million award for an EU competition entitled Blockchains for Social Good. Our innovative UnBlocked Cash Project was one of just 24 projects picked from 178 applications for the finals. Last week, Oxfam staff and our technology partners – Sempo and ConsenSys – delivered their pitch to a jury in Brussels, with the winners to be announced in the coming weeks.

Oxfam staff and representatives from ConsenSys and Sempo recently presented their findings of the project.

The project uses a decentralised platform to improve the delivery of cash aid in emergencies, allowing us to make transfers in the form of vouchers to communities caught up in disasters. What’s different, however, is that these are blockchain-powered smart vouchers, making it easier and faster to get aid to the areas where it’s needed most.

This suite of blockchain-based, stable cryptocurrencies enables efficient cross-border transactions. It is also fixed to the price of the local currency to enable people to spend as they would in their local shops and markets.

Local store owner Melika at her store with a customer using the blockchain-powered technology. Photo: Keith Parsons/OxfamAUS

The project has been piloted in the Pacific Island nation of Vanuatu, where users have shown not only is it a speedy and efficient way of transferring vouchers in an emergency, but also how the smart system updates in real time. This helps to reduce the number of resources needed to be devoted to transparency, accounting and monitoring.

Sandra Hart from Oxfam in Vanuatu described the island nation as being “the most, or the second most, disaster-prone country in the world. Because it’s a country of over 80 islands, disaster assistance takes ages to get to people. We did a nationwide study and the average time it took for people to receive assistance after a disaster was four weeks or more.”

Oxfam's Pacific Cash and Livelihood Lead Sandra Hart. Photo: Keith Parsons/OxfamAUS

But with the help of the blockchain pilot, Oxfam was able to deliver cheques to more than 13,000 volcano-affected households between December and March. “They… didn’t have to go through the process of lining up for a bag of rice,” said Sandra. “They were able to go shopping right away in their local markets.

“The key one for us, is that this will greatly reduce the timeframe, not just to deliver disaster assistance in Vanuatu, but to deliver vouchers… For the first time in Vanuatu, a community is familiar with a disaster relief system, familiar with a whole distribution system, meaning they are now well placed to design their own response and participate in that process. We really have community and tech-driven disaster assistance in the preparedness phase before something happens.”

Time for Ireland to lead on climate and support poorer nations

The climate crisis is the most urgent issue facing humanity and the planet. It affects many of the communities with which Oxfam works, disrupting their livelihoods through gradual, insidious changes in temperature and rainfall patterns, and increasing the frequency and intensity of cyclones, floods and droughts.

Vulnerability to disaster and climate change matters because it perpetuates and deepens poverty and suffering. It stands in the way of people – particularly women –being able to enjoy their basic rights and reduces their chances of ever being able to attain them.

Oxfam installed a solar powered water pump in Ghana that allows women to farm vegetables during the dry season. Ireland needs impactful climate action that helps all people. Photo: Oxfam

Ireland has fallen short on taking meaningful action to tackle climate change, with the Government dragging its heels and missing key targets. While the Government’s 2019 Climate Action Plan is a step forward, it lacks any significant ambition.

The devastating impacts of climate change are being felt everywhere and are having very real consequences on people’s lives, especially in the world’s poorest countries. As well as reducing carbon emissions at home, richer nations like Ireland must provide climate finance to ensure that the most affected countries have enough resources to support them in the fight against the climate crisis.

The government has committed to at least double the percentage of its aid budget spending on climate finance by 2030. In 2018, Ireland spent some 10 percent of its aid budget on climate – that needs to be increased to 20 percent. With climate breakdown already devastating communities, it is vital that this target is reached by 2025 at the latest.

Ahead of the general election on February 8th, Oxfam Ireland is calling on the new government to:

  • Deliver annual reductions in climate-polluting emissions of at least 8% a year for the lifetime of the next government.
  • Help poorer countries to cope with the climate emergency by spending 20 percent of its aid budget on climate finance by 2025.

Fashion Relief 2020: BIGGER AND BETTER

Awaken your inner sustainable shopper by joining us at this year’s Fashion Relief! You can bag a bargain from your favourite brand, boutique, designer or celeb and the best bit is you’ll be raising vital funds for our work in some of the world’s poorest countries.

2020 Dates

Sunday 1st March - Galmont Hotel Galway

Saturday 28th and Sunday 29th March - RDS Dublin

Don't miss your chance to:

  • Have fun!
  • Bag new, pre-loved designer and high-quality clothing from celebrities, Irish designers, top retailers, and more
  • Enjoy fashion shows, highlighting unique items from designers, boutiques and the stars
  • Get fashion advice and tips from leading Irish stylists and social influencers on the day
  • Grab yourself unbelievable bargains
  • Raise much-needed funds for people affected by poverty and disaster

 

Even if you’ve already got your ticket, there are lots of other ways to get involved!

Volunteer

Become part of the action by volunteering at the events! You could even staff your own stall, joining some of the stars who have generously pledged their clothes and time. You can volunteer for just one shift or an entire event!

Donate Your Pre-Loved Clothes and Accessories

  1. Bag up any pre-loved or new clothes, accessories or handbags – just make sure they’re in good condition and ready for the sale rail.
  2. Clearly label the bag/box FASHION RELIEF.
  3. Drop the bag/box to the nearest Oxfam Ireland shop. Find out where at oxfamireland.org/shops

 

Or you can organise a workplace clothing collection (men’s and women’s clothes and accessories) and Oxfam Ireland will pick it up directly from you - no hassle! Contact IRL-fashionrelief@oxfam.org.

More Info

At Oxfam, we have Christmas shopping all wrapped-up

With the Christmas rush fast approaching, the thoughts of shopping can leave our enthusiasm at a standstill. After all, at this time of the year, hitting the shops can feel more like a combat sport than a festive experience!

But shop with Oxfam and you could have your Christmas shopping wrapped-up with the click of a mouse. All you have to do is consider giving something different this year with the help of our Unwrapped gift range.

So, what is Unwrapped?

Each gift in the Oxfam Unwrapped range represents four funds and plays an important part in helping people affected by poverty to build a brighter future. Your gift will go where it’s needed most and begin to make an immediate difference. Each community we work with has different needs, so we ensure families living in severe poverty have a say in finding the best solution for them and we work with them to make that solution a reality.

Our amazing gift range means that there’s something for everybody – from a Goat for Christmas (€35/£32) to the WEE Gift of a toilet (€15/£13) for communities living in extreme poverty.

Or you could splash out by spending your liquid assets on Safe Water for a Family (€25/£23) to help save lives and help families thrive. With this gift, we can help set up or maintain a safe water supply for those who really need it!

The gift of Safe Water for a Family is vital for people like Amina in Ethiopia, who saw her livestock wiped out in 2017 due to drought and the lives of her children hang in the balance following a severe outbreak of cholera.

Amina carrying water back to her shelter. Photo: Pablo Tosco/Oxfam

The 50-year-old farmer and her family had to leave their home in search of water so they could survive. Now they are being supported by Oxfam, which is providing water and food to communities in the area.

What your gift means

Oxfam Christmas

How to Buy

Once you’ve selected your Unwrapped gifts, there are several ways you can buy:

1. Online here

2. Via email at irl-unwrapped@oxfam.org

3. Call our office at 1850 30 40 55 (Republic of Ireland) or 0800 0 30 40 55 (Northern Ireland). We’re open Monday to Friday, 9am-5pm.

4. Or simply drop into your local Oxfam shop. There, you can select your gift cards of choice and even pick up some other impactful Christmas gifts!

Pages