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Fighting famine in East Africa, Nigeria and Yemen. Join us.

Across the world, millions of children, women and men are starving due to a devastating food crisis. A catastrophic combination of conflict and drought has left them facing terrifying food shortages – and there is no end in sight.

In Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia in East Africa, more than 19 million people are on the brink of starvation, while war in South Sudan has forced more than 3 million from their homes, and left millions more desperate for food. In February of this year, South Sudan became the first country in the world to declare famine since 2011.  

Photo: Tina Hillier/Oxfam

In the Somali region of Ethiopia, Fadumo lost three of her children – her triplets – to malnutrition when they were less than a month old. 

The 32-year-old farmer said: “They died because of a lack of food – they were malnourished. They were less than one month old. First one child died, then two more. I was afraid.

“How can anyone be happy when they have lost three children?”

Meanwhile, the drought has claimed two-thirds of her livestock.

“I had shoats and camels,” she explained. “Before, I used to have 60 animals, now I just have 20. I have one camel which is still alive.”

Now she fears for the lives of her remaining children and said: “What will they eat? We are getting some help – have some food and water.”

But she added: “We need many things. We need food which is nourishing. Food is our biggest need.”

Elsewhere, parts of Nigeria – where at least 4.4 million people are experiencing crisis levels of hunger – are also thought to be in the grip of famine. However, the situation in the country is so volatile due to conflict that it has been almost impossible to confirm that famine has taken hold.

And in Yemen, ongoing fighting between pro-government and rebel forces has left more than 17 million people on the brink of starvation. Without a massive humanitarian response, it will be impossible to avert famine.

Millions of people – in different parts of the world – have one thing in common: they are all experiencing the devastating impact of severe hunger on a daily basis.

Oxfam is supporting communities facing famine and hunger by distributing emergency food supplies and providing clean water and sanitation as well as providing cash or cash vouchers so people can buy what they need locally, supporting local business. We are working to prevent fatal diseases such as cholera by getting clean water to the most vulnerable, and to support them get their crops growing once again so that they can feed themselves and their families.

We are already helping over one million people in Yemen, more than 600,000 in South Sudan, over 300,000 in Nigeria, 255,000 people in the Southern Somali region of Ethiopia and plan to begin a response to the drought in Somalia.

In situations where hunger and malnutrition are rife, it is usually the children who suffer the most. Even if they manage to survive prolonged periods of extreme hunger, they often pay the price in the long term as they lose their immunity and their ability to fight disease.

Like countless other infants and children in South Sudan, Tabitha’s baby daughter is in danger of becoming severely malnourished. 

Photo: Bruno Bierrenbach Feder/Oxfam

Tabitha’s daughter is sucking on a dry “Tuok” – a dry seed from a type of palm tree which is eaten when there is nothing else left.

Tabitha fled with her baby to seek refuge in Garbek, a small community in Unity State, after they were chased out of their home when violence broke out.

Now, with food so scarce, Tabitha is desperate – and resorts to eating whatever she can get her hands on.

“We feed on water lilies, fish and anything we could find in the river,” said Tabitha, who also lost most of her animals during her journey.

“What we currently need is food [and] medication. The more time it takes the worse it shall be for us.”

We’re determined to act quickly to ensure that mothers like Fadumo and Tabitha do not see their children go hungry. We have already reached many thousands of people with food, water, sanitation and support – but we are most concerned about the people we have yet to reach. 

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West Africa Crisis: food shortages threaten millions

The devastating conflict in West Africa is continuing to cause severe food shortages, plunging the region into a serious humanitarian crisis, and leaving nearly 11 million people in need of emergency aid.

Violent acts by militant insurgency group Boko Haram over the last seven years, along with military operations to counter them, have displaced around 2.6 million people in the Lake Chad Basin region, which is made up of Nigeria, Niger, Chad and Cameroon. This is Africa’s fastest growing displacement crisis.

The number of displaced people in the most affected areas has tripled over the last two years. Most of the displaced families are sheltered by communities that count among the world’s poorest and most vulnerable.

Food insecurity and malnutrition in the affected region have reached alarming levels. Thousands of people are estimated to have died already, many of these young children. There is a strong likelihood that at least 400,000 people could currently be experiencing famine in North East Nigeria.

FORCED TO FLEE

Since Boko Haram kidnapped Kadija* and forced her to marry a fighter to whom she bore a child, Kadija* faces stigma from her community, as does her child who is seen to carry ‘bad blood’. She currently lives in a camp for people displaced by the conflict with Boko Haram because her father disowned her. Kadija* was taken to the bush where she gave birth with no medical facilities. Once she deemed the baby strong enough she made her escape.

After fleeing from Boko Haram she was detained by the Nigerian military. She said: “I was kept with other women who had been forcibly married. We were tortured and dehumanised by the military. We were called wives of Boko Haram and we spent one month in detention. It was a harrowing experience. Then they released me.”

Kadija*, 18, holds her baby at a house in Maiduguri, Nigeria. Photo: Sam Tarling/Oxfam

Kadija and her baby aren’t the only ones struggling in north-eastern Nigeria right now. Brothers Digma* and Omar* (pictured below) are helping their father Hassan* in a field he rents on the outskirts of Maiduguri, Nigeria, as it’s the school holidays. Their father Hassan* was a prosperous farmer before fear of violence from Boko Haram forced him to flee his village.

Hassan* said: “We were so afraid, even if we had food we couldn’t eat what was put on the table. It was terrible. We couldn’t even come to the farm. If we came to the farm Boko Haram would come on motorcycles and kill or abduct you. We had to leave our farm and our livestock and run to the city. Before Boko Haram attacked I had a bigger farm but now I am too scared to farm it – maybe next year.”

While Hassan’s* old farm previously left him with surplus to sell, he now has to work as a labourer in order to make up the shortfall in food for his family. He said: “I have to feed my six children, my wife, my grandmother and two grandsons. How many days will [this food] last us? It’s just not going to be enough. The government have not supported us. We have to do things ourselves.

“This land has been worked on for so many years. At the other farm we had millet, sorghum, groundnuts and beans and the harvest was great. The fields there are much denser and much richer compared to this farm. The soil at the other farm is loamy. This is just sandy.”

Brothers Digma* (aged 8, and Omar* (10) stand in a field their father rents on the outskirts of Maiduguri, Nigeria. Photo: Sam Tarling/Oxfam

The conflict between Boko Haram and governments in this region has affected some of the world’s poorest people. Most of them in rural areas are farmers, and many like Hassan* have not been able to grow any crops for three years. They are in urgent need of food, water, and medical care. They are living in camps for displaced people and among host communities and are struggling to survive.

WHAT OXFAM IS DOING

The situation is dire across this region. People are in urgent need of food, water, medical care, shelter and safety.

Oxfam has helped more than 250,000 people in Nigeria, Niger and Chad since it began responding to the crisis two years ago.

In Nigeria Oxfam is distributing emergency food support food and cooking equipment, providing people with clean water and better sanitation, as well as seeds and tools to help traders and farmers. We have also set up community protection groups for women to give them information about access to support facilities if they have suffered from sexual violence and exploitation.

In Niger, Oxfam is rehabilitating and constructing boreholes to provide safe, clean water to people who have fled their homes and communities, and we are delivering life-saving food assistance to families severely affected by the crisis.

In Chad, Oxfam is distributing cash and tarpaulins for shelter, and providing clean water to help prevent the spread of diseases.

We are ramping up our programmes and are seeking funds to expand our response to help 1.5 million people in the next 15 months.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

Oxfam is urgently seeking funds to help where it’s needed most.

Please help the people of West Africa – give what you can and get food and clean drinking water to people who urgently need it.

* All names have been changed to protect identities.

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World Humanitarian Day: The people behind emergency responses

"World Humanitarian Day is an annual reminder of the need to act to alleviate the suffering. It is also an occasion to honour the humanitarian workers and volunteers toiling on the frontlines of crises. I pay tribute to these dedicated women and men who brave danger to help others at far greater risk." — UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon

On this World Humanitarian Day, we recognise the people who work tirelessly to deliver crucial humanitarian support to families and communities around the world. Each year more than 30 million people flee their homes as a result of conflict and natural disaster and over 500,000 people are killed in war. Oxfam is currently working in emergencies in over 30 countries. Some are in the public eye; some are forgotten and out of the spotlight. Thanks to the continued dedication of humanitarian workers such as those featured below, we’re able to respond to wherever we’re needed.

Sara Zehl (29) from Germany volunteers as a team leader with Oxfam, managing the distribution in the Kara Tepe camp on the island of Lesvos.

Speaking about her decision to come to Greece, Sara says: “I was at home literally sat on the couch watching the news. And I just wanted to come over and help, both the people arriving and the Greek population too, to support everyone. So I left my job working in hotel management and flew over. I have been here for six months now and whilst it is hard seeing families in this situation, I am passionate about helping and trying to make a difference."

Colm Byrne, Oxfam Ireland's Humanitarian Manager, is pictured here during a monitoring visit to Malakal, South Sudan. This region was the first place where Colm was deployed as a humanitarian worker and so when the opportunity arose to return with Oxfam, Colm says he “couldn’t say no”.

Colm’s motivation to engage in humanitarian work stems from a moment many will remember - the 1984 famine in East Africa which inspired Band Aid and subsequently Live Aid.  Speaking about how his perspective on aid work has changed over time, Colm says: “I’ve learnt that being a humanitarian is broader than I originally thought. It’s not just about people on the front line. There are lots of ways of being a humanitarian – whether you’re an urban planner creating safe spaces for people to live or local fundraiser who generates vital income.” 

Marianna Kapelle is a member of Oxfam's gender and protection team in the Filippiada camp, Epirus Region, northwest Greece. Speaking about her work, Marianna says: “As a Protection Officer with Oxfam I spend most of my time in the camps, talking with the refugees mostly in Arabic, which is my passion and helps people to share their thoughts and feel more comfortable. Part of my role is to provide as much information as possible so people are able to make the best choices for themselves and their families. I am so grateful to be able to support people who are so resilient and brave, despite everything they have been through. Everyone has so much hope still and open-hearted smiles. This is something that inspires me every day."

Vincent Malasador was part of Oxfam’s rapid assessment team that responded in the immediate aftermath to Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines in 2013. Vincent’s dedication to the cause is clear when he describes a typical work day: “We would wake up very early, take our lunch at sundown and take our sleep hours past midnight; this was the life we had to live so that we could provide the support that the struggling communities needed to survive.”

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Be part of the festival crew – volunteer as an Oxfam steward

Summer at Oxfam Ireland means festivals and each year at events across Ireland, a dedicated crew of volunteers generously give their time to help raise awareness and funds for Oxfam’s work worldwide.

STEWARDING

Oxfam stewards in action!

Our volunteers act as stewards at some of Ireland’s biggest music events and festivals, helping festival staff and security teams ensure that everyone has a fun and safe experience. In return, Oxfam Ireland receives a donation from the event organisers towards our work worldwide.

Volunteering as a steward at festivals, events and gigs is a fantastic way to learn about music event management and gain valuable work experience too.

As a steward, you can soak up the atmosphere, watch your favourite artist or band play for free and raise vital funds, from saving lives in emergencies like the current refugee crisis and helping people build better lives through long-term development work to speaking out on the issues that keep people poor. 

Sound too good to be true? Just ask our volunteers about their experience.

SIOBHAN SCURRY, FESTIVAL INTERN AND STEWARD

Siobhan Scurry works the entrance at Longitude, Marlay Park in 2015. 

Stewarding with Oxfam Ireland is the best way I can imagine spending my summer. I have worked at a heap of festivals/concerts for Oxfam including Paul Weller at Royal Hospital Kilmainham and Arcade Fire, Kings of Leon, Macklemore and Longitude at Marlay Park and I highly recommend it."

“Stewarding with Oxfam Ireland gives you the opportunity see amazing acts live and meet new people, all while giving you experience in the production of some of Ireland’s biggest summer events and experience working with the people who make them happen." 

“Every year, I have an amazing time! My highlight so far would be catching The Pixies performs ‘Hey’ on my break at Arcade Fire at Marlay Park in summer 2014!” 

RACHEL STOOPS, STEWARD

Rachel Stoops (right) and Molly Stevenson brave the rain at Croke Park for One Direction’s gig in summer 2014. 

“I got into Oxfam Ireland stewarding when a friend recommended it and after hearing how much fun it was I couldn't resist. I went on to the Oxfam Ireland website and put in my details and eagerly waited for an email. 

“I got asked to do various concerts and festivals but my favourite was One Direction at Croke Park, not only was I volunteering with my friend but we were seeing an awesome band. 

“We were selling ponchos for two reasons, the Irish rain and to #TurnCrokerGreen. We ended up raising a good bit of money for Oxfam Ireland’s work worldwide whilst having a great time. 

I couldn't urge people enough to become an Oxfam steward, it is exciting and so worthwhile.”

NATHANAELLA CORNET, STEWARD 

Nathanaella gets ready with the team of Oxfam Stewards at Longitude, Marlay Park in 2014.

“Volunteering with Oxfam Ireland made my summer magical! I did some stewarding and campaigning too. Stewarding was an amazing experience. The security crew working at gigs and festivals welcome you into their family with open arms. Most of them have amazing stories, like Brian who had a cigarette with Faithless’ singer, and so much more!

“All the volunteers are united together by the love of music and the will to change things. Laura O’Leary, Oxfam Ireland’s Public Engagement Executive, and the rest of the Oxfam crew take very good care of us, bringing crisps, water and sun cream (it was needed at one point…).

“I really did not realise I was doing anything except having fun! I had a free ticket to the last day of Longitude but I decided to volunteer instead. Just because I could and because it's so much more fun! Each gigs I attended gave me an incredible smile and energy, even the rain would only make me happier! 

“In two words: DO IT! I know I'll do it again! “

get involved

Applying to be a steward is simple. Just fill in the application form on our website to get started and fill your summer with festivals today.

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Be a cool kid, buy your dad a goat gift this Father’s Day

All the cool kids know it – goats make people smile! This Father’s Day, you could spread smiles the world over with the gift of a goat from the Oxfam Unwrapped range.

It’s the present that keeps giving back by changing the lives of families who depend on animals for their livelihood.

Goats are easy to care for, hardy and resilient even in times of drought which means they play an essential role for families living in poverty. They provide nutritious milk as well as fertiliser for crops and the money earned from selling extra milk can be sold at the local market and used to buy supplies for school, medicine and other household essentials. Plus their little kids can be passed on to another family when they grow up so many others will reap the same benefits.

Be a cool kid and buy your dad a Goat (€35/£25).

Augustina with her husband Joshua and two of their three children – daughters Ava and Emily. Photo: Adam Patterson/Oxfam

Augustina Danaa (32) is from northern Ghana and part of an Oxfam programme, run with local partners, which helps farming families to thrive despite the effects of climate change.

Augustina and her family have received a kid goat as well as chickens and pigs. She has also received training on how best to care for animals so that they stay healthy and strong as well as practical, weather-resistant farming techniques like composting which increases crop yields.

Augustina is also one of the first women to be involved in a bee-keeping project in the area.

Augustina harvesting honey. Photo: Adam Patterson/Oxfam

Before she got involved in the project, Augustina harvested and sold shea nuts. The work was very labour intensive and dangerous too as she was constantly at risk of being bitten by snakes when at work. Her income was small and erratic and the family relied heavily on what her husband Joshua earned. For four months of every year, her family did not have enough to eat.

Augustina says: “We couldn’t grow or buy enough food. I used to feel sick and unhappy. It was a bad situation. I couldn’t get enough food to feed my children, which made me feel bad as a mother. We would survive on a cup of rice each day, which meant each had just two spoonfuls. That was it.”

Now the future is much brighter for Augustina and Joshua and their three daughters since she joined Oxfam’s project. Their honey is a valuable commodity, which also keeps the family healthy. Their animals provide them with a more nutritious diet as well as additional income. Last year, she and Joshua enjoyed the best harvest in years thanks to their training in new composting techniques.

“I cannot express enough joy for the support and training we have received in these projects,” Augustina explains. “There is a great difference in my life. Now the story is different. I am benefitting from the bee farming, agricultural activities and livestock. Now we have food. We eat a variety of foods and meat. I can now buy school books, pencils and uniforms. With the rest, we can save for our children’s education.”

Feeding time on Augustina’s farm. Photo Adam Patterson/Oxfam

Other great gift ideas from the Oxfam Unwrapped range include ‘A Share in a Farmyard’ €7/£5 gift which makes sure people have the best opportunities to sustain and grow their livelihoods while Educate a Girl (€25/£19) is full of girl-power – giving girls and women the chance to learn, grow and reach their potential!

You can purchase any of our 15 life-changing Unwrapped gifts here.

Our full range of gifts are also available from your local Oxfam shop.

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