Meet Noolarami

MEET

NOOLARAMI

from uganda

Meet Noolarami from Uganda
Meet Noolarami from Uganda
Photo: Geoff Sayer / Oxfam

Noolarami Kilanga comes from a small farming village in Uganda. Like so many others, she was reliant on animals for food and income.

In the summer of 2011, disaster struck. Drought blighted her land and Noolarami’s goat died, depriving her family of one of their main sources of money.

However, thanks to your generosity new goats have been brought into the area and Noolarami now has nine. These goats have opened up new possibilities for the lives of her children, she says.

“With these goats I am now somebody. I won’t miss food again. I'm sure that my small children will now have milk.

Speaking about her youngest child – the little girl pictured on Noolarami’s back – she says: “I didn’t go to school. I will make sure that my child goes to school. The work the child would be doing, I will do in her place. I hope this child will grow up, because she’s a girl like me, that she’ll grow, she’ll go to school, she’ll get a nice job.”

We are also supporting a women’s group in Noolarami’s village. This group has been given a loan to start a new beadwork business. These entrepreneurial women now work together for the benefit of the entire community.

“We sell beadwork when there is a market. I make some profit from selling the beadwork, so I can buy more beads,” Noolarami explains. “There is always some profit remaining so that I can buy food for my family.

“Because the goats we have been given were not enough for all the women, we have some responsibilities. When my goats reproduce, I have an obligation to give nine goats to [a] lady here. After I give out the nine goats, I will not start selling animals immediately. I will let them reproduce and then at one point I'll sell, but only when I have need.”

Noolarami has a message of thanks for the supporters who made this change possible: “If a human being could be given four hearts, that is my wish for you. Life for women has changed.”

All photos by Geoff Sayer/Oxfam