Syria Crisis Appeal

Syria Crisis Appeal

Over 2 million people have no homes left. Oxfam is there. Please donate to the Syria Crisis now.

Please donate

The conflict in Syria has resulted in a severe and worsening emergency. More than 2 million refugees have fled into neighbouring countries. Those who have fled are in desperate need of shelter, food, water and medical care. We're scaling up our response to help families through the coming months.
Please give what you can today.

 

 

Syria Crisis Appeal
Samira's story
Samira's story

Samira is living with 12 other members of her family in a one room shelter. Half of the wall is made from cardboard and plastic sheeting. There is hardly any heating and the floor is wet.

“I cannot get any sort of sleep at night. I just can’t stop thinking about how to feed my children and how to protect them.

Sometimes I try to sell things that I have in order to get some money for food for the children.”

Samira decided to come to Lebanon because of the fighting in Syria. Despite trying to live a peaceful life, the shelling and shooting was happening right outside her home.

“It has been eight months since I left my home, I have no idea what happened to it - we just had to leave it behind to escape because of the fighting.

At first I was very reluctant to move to Lebanon, I changed my mind a lot but finally I decided to come here.

We couldn’t get any food anymore, we couldn’t live our lives, we lost our jobs and we worried that we couldn’t stay alive.”

What we're doing

Join us by supporting our crisis appeal to help the tens of thousands affected by the crisis in Syria. Our emergency care is focused on four key areas.

Home

Home

Since the start of the year, we've helped larger numbers of refugees to prepare for the cold winter months in Lebanon. This involves giving people warm clothes, mattresses, blankets, heaters, rugs, kitchen utensils, hygiene kits and plastic sheets for weather proofing. We'll reach more than 32,000 people in Lebanon.
Cash

Cash

We are distributing blankets and $73 dollars worth of vouchers for food and hygiene kits to families to spend as they choose in supermarkets. Supplying cash usually proves to be a more efficient means of getting much needed supplies to the people who need it most. People also find it helps them to maintain their dignity.
Counselling

Counselling

Many families in the refugee camps are exhausted and traumatised. They’ve faced bombs and bullets and have had their homes destroyed. Rape is a real feature of the war in Syria, and is cited by many refugees as the reason for fleeing. Our local partners are supplying psycho-social support and counselling.
Water

Water

In Jordan, we're providing water and sanitation to over 5,000 people in part of Zaatari camp. We're building toilets, showers and laundry areas to help those at risk in the crisis. We're constructing a new water system that will supply water to all residents of Zaatari camp, which houses some 60,000 people.
Syria Crisis Appeal

From our blog

Jan
15

Helping refugees stay warm this winter

Right now, staying warm is essential in in Ireland where we are feeling the grips of January frost and where sub-freezing temperatures are becoming normal. It’s also essential in Lebanon, where nearly one million refugees from the conflict in Syria are facing cold temperatures, rain and even snowstorms.

Read Post
Nov
20
Sep
9

The day our sweet baby was born

With 2 million refugees now fleeing from Syria, it'd be easy to lose sight of how everyday miracles are still possible amid a crisis of such staggering proportions. Meet Liqaa', a 23 year old Syrian woman who now lives in a refugee camp in Jordan.

Read Post
Jul
9

Reema’s story - a 12 Year old Syrian refugee in Lebanon

Reema (12) lives on the first floor of a house still under construction in Lebanon. There are piles of rubble and concrete all around. There are no windows, no comfort. She sleeps in a small ‘room’ with her parents and four siblings. Rats are frequent visitors.

Read Post
May
28

First impressions mask difficult reality of life in a Syrian refugee camp

Before I arrived in Jordan, Zaatari Refugee Camp in my mind had taken on almost mythical proportions. I had heard that it was initially constructed to accommodate a population of 35,000 but was now rumoured to have a registered population of more than 130,000. And frighteningly, not the largest refugee camp in the world.

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