Oct 29, 2013

Oct Technology changes everything

29
2013

This week, the Web Summit takes place in Dublin with some of the world’s most innovative start-ups and technology companies touching down in Ireland for the event. 

Founders from Dropbox, Evernote, Hootsuite and Wordpress will join the extensive line-up to explore one idea - technology is changing everything. And faster than at any other point in modern history.

This got us thinking, and we’d like to share some great examples of Oxfam's use of technology in its work to end poverty and injustice. 

Cambodia

Our innovative Pink Phones project gives mobile phones to women like Vansy (pictured) living in rural areas which they use to get the latest farming information, such as market prices for their crops and weather patterns, helping to plan the best time to harvest. Having access to this technology has transformed their lives, enabling them to sell more vegetables and build a sustainable livelihood. Simon Rawles/Oxfam

Haiti

In the aftermath of the devastating earthquake which struck the country in 2010, Natasha Mytal (pictured) was one of more than 4,000 people who received a cash transfer from Oxfam via her mobile phone in the aftermath of the devastating Haiti earthquake. “The money has really helped me to do a lot,” she says. “I’ve been able to buy oil and other food for the children and other food that I can sell in the street to earn some money.” Jane Beesley/Oxfam

Ireland

We’re always looking at new ways to raise vital funds for our programmes around the world and earlier this year we launched the Born Again range of refurbished computers online and in many of our shops, with the help of Cathy Hacket (5), Ella Sharkey (5) and Chloe Sharkey (8). It’s the green way to get digital! Each one has been restored, tested and supplied with a fresh operating system. Prices start at just €120 / £99 for a desktop and €180 / £150 for a laptop. Photo: Leon Farrell/Photocall Ireland

Hacking for Good

We're delighted to say that Oxfam will be taking part in the Web Summit Hackathon - where over 150 of the world's leading engineers, designers, product builders and entrepreneurs will apply their technological expertise to solve humanitarian, disaster relief, environmental and hunger-related problems.  

So play your part and use technology to change the world. Start by sharing this post on social media!

Keith McManus is Oxfam Ireland’s Digital Communications Manager.

Oct 17, 2013

Oct What families around the world will eat in one week

17
2013

‘Where do you do your shopping? How much are you paying for groceries? Do you shop around?’

As the recession continues to bite, the food we eat, where we buy it and how much for seem to be fast replacing the weather as the most popular topic of conversation.

Shiny supermarkets leaflets showcasing ‘2 for 1’ deals falling out of every newspaper, the rise in the number of people splitting their weekly shop in multiple supermarkets to maximise these special offers, the growth in growing vegetables at home  and the popularity of blogs such as CheapEats.ie (tagline: ‘tough times, great food’) and activist Jack Monroe’s A Girl Called Jack (documenting the challenges of feeding herself and her three-year-old son on a weekly budget of just £10/€11.70) prove as much.

In a world where there is enough for everyone to eat, 870 million of us go to bed hungry every night. It’s a place where food banks are springing up at home but where food waste is still startlingly high (a third of food bought in Ireland ends up the bin, costing the average household up to €1,000/£850 a year).

Here we visit families from Azerbaijan to Zimbabwe to see what they will eat in one week:

AZERBAIJAN

Mirza (47) and Zarkhara (37) Bakhishov and sons Khasay (18) and Elchin (15) with a week's worth of food outside their home in Shahveller village. Mirza says: “Our small cattle and poultry is everything for us. All our income and livelihood is dependent on them. The main problems for us are related to agricultural water and irrigation of our crops. We used to have problems obtaining animal feed, but now thanks to Oxfam and [partner organisation] Aktivta, our problem is solved.” David Levene/Oxfam

ETHIOPIA

Bayush photographed with her daughter Genet (14) and son Destaw (11) and week's supply of food outside their home in the village of Amba Sebat. The food includes vegetable oil, maize, sugar and shiro (chickpea flour). They live in a small thatched hut without running water or electricity. Bayush is part of a cooperative of 31 women who collectively own land on which they farm vegetables. Tom Pietrasik/Oxfam

LIBERIA

Blagnon Gnepa Herve (43) and Elise Gnamlin Boe (41) and children – (left to right) Ezechiel (21), Ange (18), Isaac (13), Jonathan (15), Moise (6) and Paul (3) – with their food rations. They’re standing outside their tent in a temporary refugee camp for people fleeing violence across the border in the Ivory Coast.

PAKISTAN

Husna La Shari, her husband and seven children live in the village of Khawand Bax La Shari. Husna is responsible for providing for her entire family as her husband is too old to work. Floods destroyed the fields she relied on for farming and harvesting. “It was difficult for me before the flood and now it is more difficult for me as there is no farming or harvesting… I am scared for how I will feed my children," she says. Timothy Allen/Oxfam

SRI LANKA

The Kumarapar family – (left to right) Thangalatchmy (44). Saratha (34), Surkitha (30) and Selvern (70) – outside their house in the village of Muruganwr with a week’s supply of food. They have thampala (a green leafy vegetable), tomatoes, potatoes, onion, chilli, spinach, leeks, cabbage, pumpkin, rice, flour and chicken. Their village is located on the border of what used to be a conflict zone. They have seen their neighbours’ homes set alight and at one point the conflict became so bad they were forced to leave and live in a refugee camp. In 2009 the conflict ended and now the family are rebuilding their lives. Abir Abdullah/Oxfam

TAJIKISTAN

BiBi-Faiz Miralieba (centre) and her family – (left to right) Siyoushi (11), niece Gulnoya Shdova (14), Jomakhon (6), Shodmon (9) and Jamila (13) – with a week’s total food supply in Kaftakharna village. Like many women in rural areas, her husband has migrated to Russia to find work, as there is not enough work for them in Tajikistan to feed their families. Andy Hall/Oxfam

ZIMBABWE

Three generations of the extended Mudzingwa family outside their home in Gutu District with their typical supply of food for a week – a bucket of ground nuts waiting to be shelled by hand and a bucket of maize flour that's turned into a porridge-style paste for every meal. They have been given a plot of land in an Oxfam-supported project and had just planted their first crop when this photograph was taken. Annie Bungeroth/Oxfam

We are helping to ensure people have enough to eat in three ways: by providing emergency food supplies in humanitarian disasters, through long-term development projects that develop sustainable farming methods and with our campaigning that gives a voice to the vulnerable, such as the women farmers who feed their communities and those who provide the raw ingredients for some of the world’s biggest brands.

But we couldn’t do this without your support. Thank you.

Sep 9, 2013

Sep The day our sweet baby was born

9
2013

Oxfam Campaigner Rachel Edwards meets Liqaa', a 23 year old refugee from Syria, who now lives in Za'atari refugee camp, in Jordan.

Following news from the United Nations High Commission on Refugees that the number of registered refugees fleeing Syria has reached 2 million, it would be easy to lose sight of how everyday miracles are still possible amid a crisis of such staggering proportions. 

Liqaa’, 23 year old refugee from Syria, moved to Za’atari refugee camp, heavily pregnant, earlier this year. Last month, she gave birth to a healthy little girl named Limar. 

Above: Limar was born on 3 August the first child of Liqaa’ and Bassel who currently live in Zaatari camp in Jordan. Photos: Pablo Tosco/Oxfam

When we went to see her, Liqaa’ told us about Limar’s arrival:

"It was such a beautiful day for me and for my husband [Basel] to see this sweet baby. I was so happy. After giving birth I was tired but after seeing her I forgot about my tiredness. 

But on what was one of the happiest days of her life, she was overcome with the sadness of being unable to share this magical day with the rest of her family back in Syria. 

"I missed my family so much on that day. I was crying, and until now I miss them... and think of going back but it's not safe. I wanted to go to give birth in Syria and be next to my family but it was too dangerous”.

Although Liqaa’ had become accustomed to the way of life in Za’atari refugee camp, after birth she realised how much she had under-estimated the hardship of raising a child in a refugee camp.

"It's so difficult to raise a baby here. The climate is too hot for her during the day, and in the night it's so cold. Hospitals here are not that good to get medicines and medical services. Adults can get by with the services we have here but for children it's much harder."

Liqaa’ and Basel’s story is not unique. With the snail’s pace of progress towards finding a political solution to the conflict, they won’t be the last to become new parents in such circumstances 

Liqaa’ also told us what becoming a new mum meant for her thoughts about the best way forward for Syria now: 

"We need peace in Syria for our children. Now that I've given birth to Limar it's even more important for me and for her to have our country back, for her to grow up there with our family. What I wish from the international community is to help the Syrian people to find a political solution, to help us to go back to our country, to our life, to our future”. 

More than 100,000 lives have been lost in the worst humanitarian crisis the world has seen in a generation. We must now support and give hope back to LIqaa’ and her family, and the millions of Syrians like them, as soon as possible. "I look forward to going back to Syria as soon as possible."

Above: With more than 100,000 people already killed in Syria, and two million people having fled to neighbouring countries, Oxfam Ireland staged media stunts in Dublin and Belfast calling on world leaders at this week’s G20 in St. Petersburg to intensify their efforts for a peaceful, political solution to end the bloodshed and the suffering of the Syrian people. Photos top and lower-right: Leon Farrell/Photocall Ireland Photo lower-left: Matt Mackey/ Press Eye

A generation of Syrians is paying too high a price in this conflict. Limar is just one of the 2 million refugees who have been seriously let down by the international community, which has failed to prioritise a political solution to the conflict. That must change. World leaders - especially President Obama and President Putin - must ensure the long-promised peace talks take place as soon as possible.

The announcement of the two millionth refugee, and this week’s G20 meeting in St. Petersburg in Russia, prompted Oxfam Ireland to repeat the call for the international community to find an urgently-needed political solution to the crisis. 

Oxfam staged campaign stunts in Dublin and Belfast city centres, with volunteers laying white flowers among rows of white gravestones to mark how more than 100,000 lives have been lost in Syria.  

It is the worst humanitarian crisis the world has seen in a generation, and Oxfam Ireland is warning that the scale of the Syria crisis is rapidly deepening. Every day more refugees cross the borders into neighbouring countries – often traumatised and in need of the basics: food, water and shelter. But the humanitarian response to the crisis is stretched to the limit.

OXFAM’S RESPONSE TO THE CRISIS IN SYRIA

Oxfam has provided humanitarian assistance to more than 200,000 refugees who have fled to Lebanon and Jordan since the start of the year. We're providing water and sanitation facilities in Zaatari refugee camp, in Jordan, and to families living in temporary settlements in both Lebanon and Jordan; as well as providing cash support to families living in rented accommodation and settlements in both countries. 

Funds are short but with more money Oxfam would be able to scale up its response to the crisis. Oxfam hopes to have reached 650,000 people by the end of the year, in Jordan, Lebanon and Syria.

No food for fuel!

In developing countries across Africa, Asia and South America, farmers are being forced off their land with devastating results. Losing access to land means that communities lose the ability to grow and collect food, water, fuel and other materials. Animals, which are often a main asset and source of income, have nowhere to graze. Communities are no longer able to provide for themselves.
 
Why is this happening? To make way for the growing of fuel for cars, not food for people.
 
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May 2, 2013

May Before and after: The ultimate upcycle!

2
2013
Our Oxfam Home stores are a treasure trove of vintage furniture. Most pieces fly out the door, but others stay a little longer as they wait for a customer who can see past first appearances. 
 
With a little imagination and a bit of elbow grease, you can transform furniture that has seen better days into a one-of-a-kind piece by upcycling.
 
Not only will you have helped the planet by recycling, you’ll also be helping to fund Oxfam Ireland’s vital work with communities around the world.
 
 
Above: The Little Museum of Dublin on St. Stephen’s Green was packed full of would-be upcyclers to hear tips from Neville Knott (top-centre) and other experts. Photos: Paul Sherwood.
 
We recently teamed up with Crown Paints and House and Home magazine to showcase just what can be done! 
 
The creative geniuses at Galerie Lisette, Quirkistuff and Upside Design worked their magic on furniture from Oxfam Home shops and unveiled the results at the recent Ultimate Upcycle event in Dublin hosted by TV presenter and interior guru Neville Knott. 
 
For more about the event plus tips from the designers, click here. A big thanks to everyone involved!
 

BEFORE

 

AFTER

 
Left to right: Once a computer desk, mum and daughter team Aida and Lucina Lennon at Galerie Lisette have turned this into a pretty dressing table. Husband and wife Les and Sue Corbett of Quirkistuff have given this tired cabinet a vibrant yellow and purple makeover complete with tassle. Upside Design’s Al Birbeck and Nawel Kouadri found the name of a previous owner inside this wardrobe, a young girl. This inspired the feminine look, complete with collage-style wallpaper.Photos: Paul Sherwood.
 
These stunning pieces are now on sale – Galerie Lisette’s floral-inspired  computer desk turned  dressing table (€195 - pictured left) and Upside Design’s gorgeous girlie wardrobe (€695 - pictured right) are at Oxfam Home, Francis Street, Dublin 2 (01-478 0777), while QuirkiStuff’s vibrant cabinet (€245 - pictured centre) can be yours by dropping into Oxfam Home on King’s Inn Street, Dublin 1 (01-874 8175).
 
The proceeds will help to change lives around the world, such as our emergency response for refugees fleeing Syria.
 
And if you’re feeling inspired, we’d love to help you pick out a piece of furniture for your upcycling project at our Oxfam Home shops (we’re also on the Dublin Road in Belfast). Drop in and get creative!
Apr 26, 2013

Apr Have peace of mind at our donation locations

26
2013

Q: What’s big, green and likes eating clothes and books?

A: Our 243 donation banks!

You’ll spot their funny slogans like “Put a sock in it. (And other clothes too)” or “I need romance. (And other books too)?".

But they do serious work, providing crucial stock for your local Oxfam shop and turning your unwanted items into life-changing funds for our work around the world. 

This week's excellent RTÉ Prime Time programme highlighted how some clothing donation banks are being targeted by criminal gangs. 

We want to let you know that we have no evidence whatsoever to suggest that our banks are being broken into. 

In fact, we identified this risk a few years and began replacing our existing banks with an extremely secure design.

Top: Your donations are in safe hands with Oxfam. Bottom: Two little girls peeking from their tent which they share with three other families in the Bekaa Valley of Lebanon.  Their mother, Zaniah Ishmail fled from the violence in Syria and brought her children here to keep them safe. "We have been here 4 months. There were two very heavy clashes between the Free Syrian Army and the Regime and we were worried that we wouldn’t have another chance to get out of our village again so we escaped.” Photo: Simon Rawles / Oxfam.

Because we know the effort you go to in order to gather clothes and books and bring them to our banks, we conduct regular and rigorous checks to ensure you can have peace of mind that your donations will go where they’re intended – the local Oxfam shop.

Your generous donations are collected by our team of uniformed drivers and branded vehicles who bring them directly to our nearest shop.

This supports our vital work, from helping refugees fleeing Syria to long-term development projects and campaigning that gives a voice to people affected by poverty and injustice.

We really need the things you don’t. Please support our Make Space for Oxfam campaign and bring unwanted clothes and books to our donation banks and shops.

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