Proving it

Feb 20, 2013

Feb Let’s Get Together to celebrate International Women’s Day

20
2013

Coffee and cupcakes, curry nights, style swops, jewellery-making classes, fashion shows and even a gospel choir performance – anything goes as our amazing supporters get ready to host their Get Together events.

We’re hoping you’ll be able to join us in celebrating International Women’s Day (Friday March 8th) by organising something simple and something fun with friends, family or colleagues – whatever and whenever you choose.

As part of our Ending Poverty Starts with Women campaign, your Get Together will help raise vital funds for our work, which puts women’s rights at its heart. 

 

CAPTIONS: Top: People across the island of Ireland are getting ready to host Get Together events and raise vital funds for Oxfam. Top-left: Oxfam is helping to provide legal advice and training to rice farmers like Halima Shida so she can maintain ownership of her land, one of the biggest issues facing women farmers in Tanzania. Barry McCall/Oxfam. Top-right: Dolores Benitez outside a radio station in Honduras where an Oxfam partner broadcasts a show educating women in the area about their rights. Gilvan Barreto/Oxfam. Bottom-left: By forming an Oxfam-supported cooperative for honey harvesting in Ethiopia, these women can earn an income. Tom Pietrasik/Oxfam. Bottom-right: Oxfam ambassador Sharon Corr meets Ester Jerome Mtegule, a Tanzanian farmer who shares her innovative farming methods for the benefit of her entire community. Barry McCall/Oxfam

Women are more likely to be poor, go hungry and be kept out of school.

We know that poverty has a female face – but so does the solution. If women farmers had the same access to land, tools, seeds and credit as men, they could grow enough food to feed more than 100 million of the world’s hungriest people.

Our Ending Poverty Starts with Women campaign ambassador Sharon Corr has travelled to Tanzania to see first-hand how your support can change the lives of women for the better.

"Meeting some of the women who have benefited from Oxfam’s work in Tanzania was truly inspiring,” she explains. “The majority of people living in poverty are women. It’s fantastic to see how Oxfam can help women reclaim their rights and make their voices heard; from supporting female farmers to tackling domestic violence."

"An Oxfam Get Together is simple. Just organise something fun with the people you love spending time with – and help raise vital funds that will transform the lives of women affected by poverty and injustice around the world.”

Feb 5, 2013

Feb Share the love this Valentine’s with Chicks & Chocolates

5
2013

We can do without the wilting roses, overpriced menus and cheesy rhymes on St. Valentine’s Day.

But chocolate is always welcome, especially when it comes in the form of Fair Trade milk chocolate hearts by Divine made with the finest cocoa, smooth cocoa butter and real vanilla.

And it’s even sweeter when coupled with our gift of life-changing chicks to make the perfect Valentine's Day gift - straight from the Oxfam Unwrapped range!

A Clutch of Chicks and Chocolates (€20/£16) funds projects in Zimbabwe – helping to provide nutritious eggs and other support for families living in poverty –  while you get a card and a lovely box of Divine chocolates to give to your special someone on February 14th.
 
 
CAPTIONS: Left: Janak and Sundari Singh stand next to the water pump Oxfam helped to build in their village in India. Once an arid yellow, their field is now green with crops all year round. “We would like our children to stay in our village when they are grown up. We don’t think they will have to move away now.” Rajendra Shaw/Oxfam. Right: Masumbuko and Grace have been through a lot. They live in the war-torn Democratic Republic of Congo, where Oxfam is helping people forced to flee their homes because of the fighting. “I fell in love with my wife the first time I saw her. There was just something about her – the way she was talking, the way she was walking, her nose and her ears. When I saw her I thought she was very, very beautiful. I can’t explain it. Some people may not think she is beautiful, but to me she is perfect.” Rankin/Oxfam
 
So to get your gift of Chicks & Chocs in time for Valentine's Day, simply order before Tuesday February 12th online.  Prefer to order by phone? Call 1850 30 40 55 (Republic of Ireland) or 0800 0 30 40 55 (Northern Ireland) between 9am - 5pm  Monday to Friday.
 
If you’re looking for other lovely gifts, choose from our extensive Oxfam Unwrapped range. Say ‘I love you’ by supporting women’s rights with Girl Power (€14/£11), sharing a passion for reading with School Books (€18/15), swapping the bubbly for Drinking Water for 3 Families (€25/£20) or making the future brighter with a Solar Panel (€32/£26).
 
Whichever gift you choose from our incredible Oxfam Unwrapped range, you’ll be helping to share the love this Valentine’s Day. Order by 3pm, Tuesday February 12th to guarantee delivery.
 
Jan 22, 2013

Jan Take a step towards ending poverty with Trailtrekker 2013

22
2013
Want to achieve something incredible this year? Walk in solidarity with people affected by poverty and injustice around the world by taking part in Trailtrekker 2013.
 
You’ll be raising vital funds in the new and improved event through the stunning Mourne Mountains on Saturday June 15th, changing lives for the better.
 
Every step you take in the new 25km route or the popular 50km event will make a positive difference, from helping the Maasai community in Tanzania ensure their land rights are protected to supporting girls and women in learning the skills to make a living in Rwanda, along with our response to emergencies such as the current situation in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
 
 
CAPTIONS: Top-left: Two Maasai men walk home in Malambo village in Tanzania. We’re supporting Maasai communities so that they are equipped to take part in a national discussion about the new Tanzanian constitution and can put forward their case for new guarantees that they won’t be moved from their land. Aubrey Wade/Oxfam. Middle-left: Girls walk to Endulen primary school in Tanzania. Children may have to trek 20km or more to get to school and back, which impacts particularly on girls’ attendance. Helping girls and women access education is part of our work to strengthen the voice of women in their communities. Ami Vitale/Oxfam. Bottom-left: On the move, families flee ongoing fighting in the Democratic Republic of Congo. We are currently providing water, sanitation, food and cash transfer to local communities and those who have fled their homes to escape the terrible conflict. Kate Holt/Oxfam. Right: One of last year's Trailtrekker teams walk in solidarity with people affected by poverty.
 
Join hundreds of people from all walks of life including complete novices and seasoned hill-walkers in this inspirational event.
 
Simply get your team of between three and six people together and we’ll look after you and your teammates on every step of your Trailtrekker journey.
 
Sign up before the end of February to avail of our early bird rate with 50 per cent off the registration fee.
 
The ultimate team event is back. Will you take the first steps towards ending poverty today?
Jan 11, 2013

Jan Haiti: three earthquake commemorations, three steps in reconstruction

11
2013

 

On January 12th, 2010, a devastating earthquake struck Haiti. People across the island of Ireland made an incredible response to our emergency appeal, raising €1.1 million. Thanks to the generosity and solidarity of supporters like you, a lot of tangible progress has been made. However major challenges remain to rebuild Haiti. Three years on, hundreds of thousands of Haitians are still living under tents and tarpaulins with very limited access to basic services, such as sanitation, health care and education.  
 
Urban planner Agathe Nougaret has been living and working in Haiti since December 2010. She joined Oxfam as an Urban Coordinator in August 2012. Here, she writes about finding hope as the third anniversary of the earthquake approaches.
 
I can’t believe it’s been three years already since the earthquake hit in January 2010. I wasn’t in Haiti for “le 12” (“the 12th” a local term to refer to the earthquake), I didn’t witness the mayhem and great solidarity with my own eyes. I arrived months after, when the reconstruction process was supposed to kick-off, once rescue teams and emergency settlement professionals had done their job.
 
 
 
CAPTIONS: Top-Left: “Buying drinkable water every day was not that easy for people in the neighbourhood. This is one more reason to value the Oxfam intervention,” says Andson Fils-Aimé, who helped build this protected spring-fed water-collection point in the Merger area. Photo: Anna Fawcus / Oxfam. Top-Right: A broken landmark in Croix-Desprez, Port-au-Prince. Photo: Agathe Nougaret/Oxfam. Bottom-left: This mountain of waste in Croix-Desprez, Port-au-Prince, is a daunting task for 2013. Agathe Nougaret/Oxfam Bottom-Right: Yvon Neptune (58): “I moved here in 2009, so I can tell what the difference is since Oxfam did the water captage and canalisation, and started its sensitisation campaign in 2011. This is the answer to the cholera threat and also to other waterborne diseases and malaria.” 

January, 12th, 2011

I spent the first anniversary of the earthquake on the steps of the destroyed cathedral, in downtown Port-au-Prince. In the middle of a political crisis, Haitians had stopped burning tyres to ask for their vote to be accounted for. Everyone gathered in front of this symbol of despair, dressed in white, screaming his or her pain. I was so overwhelmed that I didn’t prepare for the questions. As a foreigner, many people came to me to ask why the international community was not rebuilding homes for the victims and stopping the cholera outbreak. I did my best to explain that the scale of the disaster took everyone aback, and setting up temporary settlements, camps in other words, was a complicated and tedious task. “There are less cholera victims in camps than anywhere else thanks to NGO efforts”, I said, but my voice got lost in the fervent religious clamour. What could I say, how could I justify the stalemate Haiti experienced? No available land, no government... I didn’t have words of comfort for the people suffering around me.

January 12th, 2012

Last year, I went to the Port-au-Prince cemetery for the second anniversary of the earthquake. There I met cemetery employees who had to deal with thousands of bodies days after the earthquake. Their stories sent shivers down my spine. Next to the 01/12 memorial sculpture newly built in the cemetery, I met a poet and a painter who explained to me how art helped them to cope with the trauma. They were hopeful, though. So much rubble had been cleared in the past year. The new president promised to take action for what really matters, education of Haitian kids. NGOs were starting to repair homes and even build permanent houses. Over the Christmas holiday, the camp in front of my office had been cleared by the Haitian government through a relocation programme run by international agencies. I was personally involved in this great movement, and I was proud. These first little steps were the hardest to take, as we were paving the way for an important scale-up in relocation and reconstruction efforts.
 

January 12th, 2013

I haven’t decided where I’ll spend the anniversary yet. I want to be somewhere significant, where I feel part of the Haitian community. I think I’ll choose the Villa Rosa slum, where I completed a NGO project last June, repairing and building 600 permanent homes. I don’t want to join the choir of critics who state that big land-owners will never help us rebuild the country, that the Government doesn’t have the means to do its job, that 358,000 people still live in camps. They might be right, but I want to celebrate our successes, this year. We have found ways to involve the community in planning, rebuilding and managing their neighbourhoods, and we’ve helped the government to see slums as a challenge, not as a threat. We’re working hard to convince donors to let us replicate this first set of pilot projects. The task was so daunting three years ago, but slowly, we’re getting there. That’s what I want to remember on January 12th.
 
Dec 24, 2012

Dec You made the difference in 2012

24
2012

Relief for those caught in crisis. Water where there was drought. Communities equipped with the skills and knowledge to help themselves. Campaigning that challenges injustice and the root causes of poverty.

Lives changed. All made possible in 2012 by supporters with big hearts and one united voice.

ABOVE: Adoaga from Chad pictured with her family.  We continue to reach people in West Africa through the work you support.

As we mark the end of 2012 and look forward to the New Year, I want to express my gratitude to each and every one of you for what we’ve achieved together in 2012.

Operating in a difficult economic climate has meant that we must do more with less, which is why we are so grateful for your support.

In the past year, you supported our life-changing work with your time, your energy, your dedication and your money.

Regardless of how you contributed, your support has made the difference.

It’s thanks to you that we can achieve so much... from taking the lead in Ireland by responding to the West Africa food crisis to showing politicians North and South why women’s rights must be put at the heart of the international agenda through our Ending Poverty Starts with Women campaign.

We have also continued our work with people affected by the 2011 East Africa food crisis in Kenya and Somalia, along with responding the escalating situation in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where we are currently providing water, sanitation, food and cash transfer to local communities and those who have fled their homes to escape the terrible conflict.

AVOVE: Supporters at festivals for our campaign on women's rights.  RIGHT: Sharon Corr visits Tanzania with Oxfam to support the same campaign and to raise awareness about the issues that women face.

Our team in Tanzania is reaching hundreds of thousands of people with the We Can campaign, which tackles the attitudes and behaviours that permit violence against women and encourages ordinary people to become change-makers in their local communities, recruiting others to do the same. This is just one of many incredible initiatives taking place in the 94 countries where we work around the world.

Our success in helping people affected by poverty and injustice to change their lives for the better would be impossible without the support of people like you.

On behalf of all the team at Oxfam Ireland, we wish you a very Happy New Year.

Jim Clarken
Chief Executive
Oxfam Ireland

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